Dense inflammation does not mask residual primary basal cell carcinoma during Mohs micrographic surgery

Kenneth H. Katz, Klaus F. Helm, Elizabeth M. Billingsley, Mary E. Maloney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Areas of dense inflammation are commonly removed during Mohs micrographic surgery for basal cell carcinoma because of the concern that they may mask areas of tumor. Objective: Our purpose was to determine whether inflammation masks tumor during Mohs surgery for primary basal cell carcinoma. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive cases of primary basal cell carcinoma with areas of dense inflammation encountered during Mobs surgery were sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Ber-EP4. Results: In no cases did the dense inflammation mask residual tumor. Conclusion: Dense inflammation does not mask primary basal cell carcinoma during Mohs surgery and should be carefully evaluated before additional surgery is performed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-238
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Mohs Surgery
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Masks
Inflammation
Residual Neoplasm
Hematoxylin
Eosine Yellowish-(YS)
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Areas of dense inflammation are commonly removed during Mohs micrographic surgery for basal cell carcinoma because of the concern that they may mask areas of tumor. Objective: Our purpose was to determine whether inflammation masks tumor during Mohs surgery for primary basal cell carcinoma. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive cases of primary basal cell carcinoma with areas of dense inflammation encountered during Mobs surgery were sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Ber-EP4. Results: In no cases did the dense inflammation mask residual tumor. Conclusion: Dense inflammation does not mask primary basal cell carcinoma during Mohs surgery and should be carefully evaluated before additional surgery is performed.",
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Dense inflammation does not mask residual primary basal cell carcinoma during Mohs micrographic surgery. / Katz, Kenneth H.; Helm, Klaus F.; Billingsley, Elizabeth M.; Maloney, Mary E.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 45, No. 2, 01.01.2001, p. 231-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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