Derivation and characterization of POJ cells, transformed human fetal glial cells that retain their permissivity for JC virus

C. Mandl, D. L. Walker, R. J. Frisque

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study of the medically important polyomavirus JC virus is limited to only a few laboratories, primarily because the permissive cell system most often used, primary human fetal glial cells, is difficult to obtain and propagate. We have introduced mutations at the origin of DNA replication of JC virus and transformed glial cells with the replication-defective genomes. Although normal glial cell cultures rapidly lose their permissivity for the virus after subculture, the transformed cells (designated POJ) had a greatly expanded life span and remained permissive for JC virus even after 30 passages in vitro. POJ cells constitutively express a functional T protein that complements the replication defect of lethal early-region mutations in JC virus. We expect that these cells will greatly facilitate the study of this human virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)755-763
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume61
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1987

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JC polyomavirus
JC Virus
neuroglia
Neuroglia
Polyomavirus
cells
Viruses
mutation
vertebrate viruses
Mutation
Replication Origin
DNA replication
DNA Replication
lethal genes
Complement System Proteins
complement
cell culture
Cell Culture Techniques
Genome
viruses

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology

Cite this

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Derivation and characterization of POJ cells, transformed human fetal glial cells that retain their permissivity for JC virus. / Mandl, C.; Walker, D. L.; Frisque, R. J.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 61, No. 3, 1987, p. 755-763.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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