Dermatoses among floral shop workers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Concern about the increasing incidence of hand dermatitis in floral shop workers in the United States and its possible association to the plant Alstroemeria, a flower that has become popular since its introduction in 1981, prompted investigation of the prevalence and cause of hand dermatitis in a sample of floral workers. Fifty-seven floral workers were surveyed, and 15 (26%) reported hand dermatitis within the previous 12 months. Sixteen floral workers (eight with dermatitis) volunteered to be patch tested to the North American Contact Dermatitis Group Standard and Perfume Trays, a series of eight pesticides and 20 plant allergens. Of four of seven floral designers and arrangers who reported hand dermatitis, three reacted positively to patch tests to tuliposide A, the allergen in Alstroemeria. Patch test readings for all other plant extracts were negative. A positive reading for a test to one pesticide, di-folatan (Captafol), was noted, the relevance of which is unknown.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-58
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

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Dermatitis
Skin Diseases
Alstroemeria
Hand
Patch Tests
Pesticides
Allergens
Reading
Perfume
Contact Dermatitis
Plant Extracts
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

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abstract = "Concern about the increasing incidence of hand dermatitis in floral shop workers in the United States and its possible association to the plant Alstroemeria, a flower that has become popular since its introduction in 1981, prompted investigation of the prevalence and cause of hand dermatitis in a sample of floral workers. Fifty-seven floral workers were surveyed, and 15 (26{\%}) reported hand dermatitis within the previous 12 months. Sixteen floral workers (eight with dermatitis) volunteered to be patch tested to the North American Contact Dermatitis Group Standard and Perfume Trays, a series of eight pesticides and 20 plant allergens. Of four of seven floral designers and arrangers who reported hand dermatitis, three reacted positively to patch tests to tuliposide A, the allergen in Alstroemeria. Patch test readings for all other plant extracts were negative. A positive reading for a test to one pesticide, di-folatan (Captafol), was noted, the relevance of which is unknown.",
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Dermatoses among floral shop workers. / Thiboutot, D. M.; Hamory, B. H.; Marks, J. G.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.01.1990, p. 54-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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