Description of Criterion Validity of the Autism Spectrum Rating Scales 6–18 Parent Report

Initial Exploration in a Large Community Sample

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research regarding psychometric properties of autism spectrum disorder questionnaires is lacking. This study explored the criterion validity of the ASRS 6–18 parent report (ASRS-6–18-P) in a large, well-characterized, real-world clinical sample of 422 children (X¯ age= 10.04 ; autism [AUT] n = 139; non-autism [NOT] n = 283) evaluated with the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-2, a gold-standard measure. Significant mean differences were observed for DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors. Total, DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors demonstrated significant correlations with ADOS-2 comparison scores (modules 1–3), but not with module 4 (raw) scores. DSM-5 and Unusual Behaviors demonstrated significant but poor AUCs (0.60). Findings with/without covariates (IQ/age) were overall similar. Sensitivity and specificity could not be optimized. The suggested cutpoint (T-score = 60) demonstrated unacceptably high false positive rates (> 76.33%). While findings suggest limited diagnostic utility of the ASRS-6–18-P, the sample’s complex psychiatric presentation and measurement error inherent in cutoff score application should be considered when generalizing results. Further research is recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalChild Psychiatry and Human Development
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Autistic Disorder
Research
Psychometrics
Gold
Area Under Curve
Psychiatry
Appointments and Schedules
Observation
Sensitivity and Specificity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Description of Criterion Validity of the Autism Spectrum Rating Scales 6–18 Parent Report: Initial Exploration in a Large Community Sample",
abstract = "Research regarding psychometric properties of autism spectrum disorder questionnaires is lacking. This study explored the criterion validity of the ASRS 6–18 parent report (ASRS-6–18-P) in a large, well-characterized, real-world clinical sample of 422 children (X¯ age= 10.04 ; autism [AUT] n = 139; non-autism [NOT] n = 283) evaluated with the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-2, a gold-standard measure. Significant mean differences were observed for DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors. Total, DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors demonstrated significant correlations with ADOS-2 comparison scores (modules 1–3), but not with module 4 (raw) scores. DSM-5 and Unusual Behaviors demonstrated significant but poor AUCs (0.60). Findings with/without covariates (IQ/age) were overall similar. Sensitivity and specificity could not be optimized. The suggested cutpoint (T-score = 60) demonstrated unacceptably high false positive rates (> 76.33{\%}). While findings suggest limited diagnostic utility of the ASRS-6–18-P, the sample’s complex psychiatric presentation and measurement error inherent in cutoff score application should be considered when generalizing results. Further research is recommended.",
author = "Camodeca, {Amy Suzanne}",
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