Description of Criterion Validity of the Autism Spectrum Rating Scales 6–18 Parent Report: Initial Exploration in a Large Community Sample

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research regarding psychometric properties of autism spectrum disorder questionnaires is lacking. This study explored the criterion validity of the ASRS 6–18 parent report (ASRS-6–18-P) in a large, well-characterized, real-world clinical sample of 422 children (X¯ age= 10.04 ; autism [AUT] n = 139; non-autism [NOT] n = 283) evaluated with the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-2, a gold-standard measure. Significant mean differences were observed for DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors. Total, DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors demonstrated significant correlations with ADOS-2 comparison scores (modules 1–3), but not with module 4 (raw) scores. DSM-5 and Unusual Behaviors demonstrated significant but poor AUCs (0.60). Findings with/without covariates (IQ/age) were overall similar. Sensitivity and specificity could not be optimized. The suggested cutpoint (T-score = 60) demonstrated unacceptably high false positive rates (> 76.33%). While findings suggest limited diagnostic utility of the ASRS-6–18-P, the sample’s complex psychiatric presentation and measurement error inherent in cutoff score application should be considered when generalizing results. Further research is recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)987-1001
Number of pages15
JournalChild Psychiatry and Human Development
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Research
Psychometrics
Gold
Area Under Curve
Psychiatry
Appointments and Schedules
Observation
Sensitivity and Specificity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{d1fc5fc3f89440068ff140e53d8f8b07,
title = "Description of Criterion Validity of the Autism Spectrum Rating Scales 6–18 Parent Report: Initial Exploration in a Large Community Sample",
abstract = "Research regarding psychometric properties of autism spectrum disorder questionnaires is lacking. This study explored the criterion validity of the ASRS 6–18 parent report (ASRS-6–18-P) in a large, well-characterized, real-world clinical sample of 422 children (X¯ age= 10.04 ; autism [AUT] n = 139; non-autism [NOT] n = 283) evaluated with the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-2, a gold-standard measure. Significant mean differences were observed for DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors. Total, DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors demonstrated significant correlations with ADOS-2 comparison scores (modules 1–3), but not with module 4 (raw) scores. DSM-5 and Unusual Behaviors demonstrated significant but poor AUCs (0.60). Findings with/without covariates (IQ/age) were overall similar. Sensitivity and specificity could not be optimized. The suggested cutpoint (T-score = 60) demonstrated unacceptably high false positive rates (> 76.33{\%}). While findings suggest limited diagnostic utility of the ASRS-6–18-P, the sample’s complex psychiatric presentation and measurement error inherent in cutoff score application should be considered when generalizing results. Further research is recommended.",
author = "Camodeca, {Amy Suzanne}",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10578-019-00899-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "987--1001",
journal = "Child Psychiatry and Human Development",
issn = "0009-398X",
publisher = "Kluwer Academic/Human Sciences Press Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Description of Criterion Validity of the Autism Spectrum Rating Scales 6–18 Parent Report

T2 - Initial Exploration in a Large Community Sample

AU - Camodeca, Amy Suzanne

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Research regarding psychometric properties of autism spectrum disorder questionnaires is lacking. This study explored the criterion validity of the ASRS 6–18 parent report (ASRS-6–18-P) in a large, well-characterized, real-world clinical sample of 422 children (X¯ age= 10.04 ; autism [AUT] n = 139; non-autism [NOT] n = 283) evaluated with the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-2, a gold-standard measure. Significant mean differences were observed for DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors. Total, DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors demonstrated significant correlations with ADOS-2 comparison scores (modules 1–3), but not with module 4 (raw) scores. DSM-5 and Unusual Behaviors demonstrated significant but poor AUCs (0.60). Findings with/without covariates (IQ/age) were overall similar. Sensitivity and specificity could not be optimized. The suggested cutpoint (T-score = 60) demonstrated unacceptably high false positive rates (> 76.33%). While findings suggest limited diagnostic utility of the ASRS-6–18-P, the sample’s complex psychiatric presentation and measurement error inherent in cutoff score application should be considered when generalizing results. Further research is recommended.

AB - Research regarding psychometric properties of autism spectrum disorder questionnaires is lacking. This study explored the criterion validity of the ASRS 6–18 parent report (ASRS-6–18-P) in a large, well-characterized, real-world clinical sample of 422 children (X¯ age= 10.04 ; autism [AUT] n = 139; non-autism [NOT] n = 283) evaluated with the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-2, a gold-standard measure. Significant mean differences were observed for DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors. Total, DSM-5, social, and unusual behaviors demonstrated significant correlations with ADOS-2 comparison scores (modules 1–3), but not with module 4 (raw) scores. DSM-5 and Unusual Behaviors demonstrated significant but poor AUCs (0.60). Findings with/without covariates (IQ/age) were overall similar. Sensitivity and specificity could not be optimized. The suggested cutpoint (T-score = 60) demonstrated unacceptably high false positive rates (> 76.33%). While findings suggest limited diagnostic utility of the ASRS-6–18-P, the sample’s complex psychiatric presentation and measurement error inherent in cutoff score application should be considered when generalizing results. Further research is recommended.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85066609371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85066609371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10578-019-00899-0

DO - 10.1007/s10578-019-00899-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 31152377

AN - SCOPUS:85066609371

VL - 50

SP - 987

EP - 1001

JO - Child Psychiatry and Human Development

JF - Child Psychiatry and Human Development

SN - 0009-398X

IS - 6

ER -