Description of two new gill Myxozoans from smallmouth (Micropterus dolomieu) and largemouth (Micropterus salmoides) bass

Heather L. Walsh, Luke R. Iwanowicz, Gavin W. Glenney, Deborah D. Iwanowicz, Vicki Suzette Blazer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two previously undescribed species of myxozoan parasites were observed in the gills of bass inhabiting the Potomac and James River basins. They are described using morphological characteristics and small-subunit (SSU) rDNA gene sequences. Both were taxonomically identified as new species of Myxobolus; Myxobolus branchiarum n. sp. was found exclusively in smallmouth bass, and Myxobolus micropterii n. sp. was found in largemouth and smallmouth bass. Small, spherical, white plasmodia of M. branchiarum from smallmouth bass were observed grossly in the gills; these plasmodia had an average length of 320.3 μm and width of 246.1 μm. The development of the plasmodia is intralamellar in the secondary lamellae of the gills. Mature spores were pyriform in shape with a length of 12.8 ± 1.4 (8.1-15.1) μm and width of 6.9 ± 1.1 (4.0-9.0) μm. Analysis of SSU rDNA identified M. branchiarum in a sister-group to 3 species of Henneguya, although morphologically caudal appendages were absent. Myxobolus micropterii observed in the gills of largemouth and smallmouth bass had larger, ovoid, cream-colored plasmodia with an average length of 568.1 μm and width of 148.1 μm. The cysts developed at the distal end of the gill filament within the primary lamellae. The mature spores were ovoid in shape with a length of 10.8 ± 0.7 (9.2-12.2) m and width of 10.6 ± 0.6 (9.011.8) μm. SSU rDNA analysis placed M. micropterii in a sister group with Henneguya lobosa and Myxobolus oliveirai. The highest prevalence of M. branchiarum was observed in the gills of bass collected from the Cowpasture River (50.9%). Prevalence was 44.6% in bass from the Potomac River and only 4.3% in bass collected from the Shenandoah River. A seasonal study of M. branchiarum, which included both infected and uninfected smallmouth bass, determined that a significantly higher intensity was observed in the spring than in the summer (P < 0.001) or fall (P = 0.004). In an analysis excluding uninfected bass, a higher intensity was observed in the spring than in the summer (P = 0.001) or fall (P = 0.008). Prevalence and seasonal differences were not determined for M. micropterii.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)415-422
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Parasitology
Volume98
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Fingerprint

Micropterus dolomieu
Bass
Micropterus salmoides
Myxobolus
bass
gills
Plasmodium
spore
Henneguya
Potomac River
river
Rivers
summer
James River (Virginia)
cyst
Ribosomal DNA
parasite
spores
river basin
new species

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Walsh, Heather L. ; Iwanowicz, Luke R. ; Glenney, Gavin W. ; Iwanowicz, Deborah D. ; Blazer, Vicki Suzette. / Description of two new gill Myxozoans from smallmouth (Micropterus dolomieu) and largemouth (Micropterus salmoides) bass. In: Journal of Parasitology. 2012 ; Vol. 98, No. 2. pp. 415-422.
@article{b7acc4034b544b81a9bf4b69115c2b26,
title = "Description of two new gill Myxozoans from smallmouth (Micropterus dolomieu) and largemouth (Micropterus salmoides) bass",
abstract = "Two previously undescribed species of myxozoan parasites were observed in the gills of bass inhabiting the Potomac and James River basins. They are described using morphological characteristics and small-subunit (SSU) rDNA gene sequences. Both were taxonomically identified as new species of Myxobolus; Myxobolus branchiarum n. sp. was found exclusively in smallmouth bass, and Myxobolus micropterii n. sp. was found in largemouth and smallmouth bass. Small, spherical, white plasmodia of M. branchiarum from smallmouth bass were observed grossly in the gills; these plasmodia had an average length of 320.3 μm and width of 246.1 μm. The development of the plasmodia is intralamellar in the secondary lamellae of the gills. Mature spores were pyriform in shape with a length of 12.8 ± 1.4 (8.1-15.1) μm and width of 6.9 ± 1.1 (4.0-9.0) μm. Analysis of SSU rDNA identified M. branchiarum in a sister-group to 3 species of Henneguya, although morphologically caudal appendages were absent. Myxobolus micropterii observed in the gills of largemouth and smallmouth bass had larger, ovoid, cream-colored plasmodia with an average length of 568.1 μm and width of 148.1 μm. The cysts developed at the distal end of the gill filament within the primary lamellae. The mature spores were ovoid in shape with a length of 10.8 ± 0.7 (9.2-12.2) m and width of 10.6 ± 0.6 (9.011.8) μm. SSU rDNA analysis placed M. micropterii in a sister group with Henneguya lobosa and Myxobolus oliveirai. The highest prevalence of M. branchiarum was observed in the gills of bass collected from the Cowpasture River (50.9{\%}). Prevalence was 44.6{\%} in bass from the Potomac River and only 4.3{\%} in bass collected from the Shenandoah River. A seasonal study of M. branchiarum, which included both infected and uninfected smallmouth bass, determined that a significantly higher intensity was observed in the spring than in the summer (P < 0.001) or fall (P = 0.004). In an analysis excluding uninfected bass, a higher intensity was observed in the spring than in the summer (P = 0.001) or fall (P = 0.008). Prevalence and seasonal differences were not determined for M. micropterii.",
author = "Walsh, {Heather L.} and Iwanowicz, {Luke R.} and Glenney, {Gavin W.} and Iwanowicz, {Deborah D.} and Blazer, {Vicki Suzette}",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1645/GE-2918.1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "98",
pages = "415--422",
journal = "Journal of Parasitology",
issn = "0022-3395",
publisher = "American Society of Parasitologists",
number = "2",

}

Description of two new gill Myxozoans from smallmouth (Micropterus dolomieu) and largemouth (Micropterus salmoides) bass. / Walsh, Heather L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Glenney, Gavin W.; Iwanowicz, Deborah D.; Blazer, Vicki Suzette.

In: Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 98, No. 2, 01.04.2012, p. 415-422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Description of two new gill Myxozoans from smallmouth (Micropterus dolomieu) and largemouth (Micropterus salmoides) bass

AU - Walsh, Heather L.

AU - Iwanowicz, Luke R.

AU - Glenney, Gavin W.

AU - Iwanowicz, Deborah D.

AU - Blazer, Vicki Suzette

PY - 2012/4/1

Y1 - 2012/4/1

N2 - Two previously undescribed species of myxozoan parasites were observed in the gills of bass inhabiting the Potomac and James River basins. They are described using morphological characteristics and small-subunit (SSU) rDNA gene sequences. Both were taxonomically identified as new species of Myxobolus; Myxobolus branchiarum n. sp. was found exclusively in smallmouth bass, and Myxobolus micropterii n. sp. was found in largemouth and smallmouth bass. Small, spherical, white plasmodia of M. branchiarum from smallmouth bass were observed grossly in the gills; these plasmodia had an average length of 320.3 μm and width of 246.1 μm. The development of the plasmodia is intralamellar in the secondary lamellae of the gills. Mature spores were pyriform in shape with a length of 12.8 ± 1.4 (8.1-15.1) μm and width of 6.9 ± 1.1 (4.0-9.0) μm. Analysis of SSU rDNA identified M. branchiarum in a sister-group to 3 species of Henneguya, although morphologically caudal appendages were absent. Myxobolus micropterii observed in the gills of largemouth and smallmouth bass had larger, ovoid, cream-colored plasmodia with an average length of 568.1 μm and width of 148.1 μm. The cysts developed at the distal end of the gill filament within the primary lamellae. The mature spores were ovoid in shape with a length of 10.8 ± 0.7 (9.2-12.2) m and width of 10.6 ± 0.6 (9.011.8) μm. SSU rDNA analysis placed M. micropterii in a sister group with Henneguya lobosa and Myxobolus oliveirai. The highest prevalence of M. branchiarum was observed in the gills of bass collected from the Cowpasture River (50.9%). Prevalence was 44.6% in bass from the Potomac River and only 4.3% in bass collected from the Shenandoah River. A seasonal study of M. branchiarum, which included both infected and uninfected smallmouth bass, determined that a significantly higher intensity was observed in the spring than in the summer (P < 0.001) or fall (P = 0.004). In an analysis excluding uninfected bass, a higher intensity was observed in the spring than in the summer (P = 0.001) or fall (P = 0.008). Prevalence and seasonal differences were not determined for M. micropterii.

AB - Two previously undescribed species of myxozoan parasites were observed in the gills of bass inhabiting the Potomac and James River basins. They are described using morphological characteristics and small-subunit (SSU) rDNA gene sequences. Both were taxonomically identified as new species of Myxobolus; Myxobolus branchiarum n. sp. was found exclusively in smallmouth bass, and Myxobolus micropterii n. sp. was found in largemouth and smallmouth bass. Small, spherical, white plasmodia of M. branchiarum from smallmouth bass were observed grossly in the gills; these plasmodia had an average length of 320.3 μm and width of 246.1 μm. The development of the plasmodia is intralamellar in the secondary lamellae of the gills. Mature spores were pyriform in shape with a length of 12.8 ± 1.4 (8.1-15.1) μm and width of 6.9 ± 1.1 (4.0-9.0) μm. Analysis of SSU rDNA identified M. branchiarum in a sister-group to 3 species of Henneguya, although morphologically caudal appendages were absent. Myxobolus micropterii observed in the gills of largemouth and smallmouth bass had larger, ovoid, cream-colored plasmodia with an average length of 568.1 μm and width of 148.1 μm. The cysts developed at the distal end of the gill filament within the primary lamellae. The mature spores were ovoid in shape with a length of 10.8 ± 0.7 (9.2-12.2) m and width of 10.6 ± 0.6 (9.011.8) μm. SSU rDNA analysis placed M. micropterii in a sister group with Henneguya lobosa and Myxobolus oliveirai. The highest prevalence of M. branchiarum was observed in the gills of bass collected from the Cowpasture River (50.9%). Prevalence was 44.6% in bass from the Potomac River and only 4.3% in bass collected from the Shenandoah River. A seasonal study of M. branchiarum, which included both infected and uninfected smallmouth bass, determined that a significantly higher intensity was observed in the spring than in the summer (P < 0.001) or fall (P = 0.004). In an analysis excluding uninfected bass, a higher intensity was observed in the spring than in the summer (P = 0.001) or fall (P = 0.008). Prevalence and seasonal differences were not determined for M. micropterii.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84860272897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84860272897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1645/GE-2918.1

DO - 10.1645/GE-2918.1

M3 - Article

VL - 98

SP - 415

EP - 422

JO - Journal of Parasitology

JF - Journal of Parasitology

SN - 0022-3395

IS - 2

ER -