Descriptive epidemiology of night sweats upon admission to a university hospital

Michele J. Lea, Robert Aber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Between March 1 and Sept 1, 1980, we interviewed a 25% random sample of patients admitted to medicine, surgery, and obstetric, and gynecology services to determine the frequency and descriptive characteristics of night sweats (NS). Seventy-two (41%) of 174 patients interviewed reported NS within three months before admission. Obstetric patients reported NS significantly more often than nonobstetric patients (60% vs 33%, P <.02). The duration of NS ranged from one day to 27 years (mean 10.5 months; median two months). NS were mild in 36 (50%), moderate in 17 (24%), and severe in 19 (26%). Severe NS were reported significantly more often by nonobstetric patients, and most often by those on the medicine service. Among nonobstetric patients, NS were associated with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland, and severe NS with the use of antipyretics. NS were not associated with elevated temperature measurements during hospitalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1065-1067
Number of pages3
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume78
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

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Sweat
Epidemiology
Obstetric Surgical Procedures
Medicine
Antipyretics
Gynecology
Obstetrics
Prostate
Adenocarcinoma
Hospitalization
Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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Descriptive epidemiology of night sweats upon admission to a university hospital. / Lea, Michele J.; Aber, Robert.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 78, No. 9, 01.01.1985, p. 1065-1067.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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