Design and in vivo testing of a permanent implantable left ventricular assist device

Gerson Rosenberg, William Weiss, A. J. Snyder, W. S. Pierce

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Development of an implantable electric motor ventricular assist device was initiated at The Pennsylvania State University in 1978. The first system developed utilized a drum cam and cam followers to convert rotary to rectilinear motion. This initial system weighed over one kilogram. The system was subsequently redesigned to utilize a roller screw mechanism (Transrol or Rollvis). The use of the roller screw mechanism reduced the weight of the energy converter to below 700 grams. To date, 33 calves have had long-term left ventricular to aortic assistance with a hermetically sealed roller screw device, with continuous pumping for as long as 235 days. Two of these animals have had completely implanted systems with telemetry. The system currently in use consists of a totally implanted blood pump, energy converter, electronics and implanted battery, along with a transcutaneous energy transmission system. This system employs no percutaneous leads; all energy is transmitted transcutaneously by inductive coupling. This is the only system currently undergoing in vivo evaluation that utilizes transcutaneous energy transmission and two-way telemetry. Continued in vivo and in vitro testing will be conducted in an effort to refine the design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication1992 Advances in Bioengineering
PublisherPubl by ASME
Pages501-504
Number of pages4
Volume22
ISBN (Print)0791811166
StatePublished - Dec 1 1992
EventWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers - Anaheim, CA, USA
Duration: Nov 8 1992Nov 13 1992

Other

OtherWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers
CityAnaheim, CA, USA
Period11/8/9211/13/92

Fingerprint

Left ventricular assist devices
Cams
Telemetering
Testing
Electric motors
Animals
Blood
Electronic equipment
Pumps

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Rosenberg, G., Weiss, W., Snyder, A. J., & Pierce, W. S. (1992). Design and in vivo testing of a permanent implantable left ventricular assist device. In 1992 Advances in Bioengineering (Vol. 22, pp. 501-504). Publ by ASME.
Rosenberg, Gerson ; Weiss, William ; Snyder, A. J. ; Pierce, W. S. / Design and in vivo testing of a permanent implantable left ventricular assist device. 1992 Advances in Bioengineering. Vol. 22 Publ by ASME, 1992. pp. 501-504
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Rosenberg, G, Weiss, W, Snyder, AJ & Pierce, WS 1992, Design and in vivo testing of a permanent implantable left ventricular assist device. in 1992 Advances in Bioengineering. vol. 22, Publ by ASME, pp. 501-504, Winter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Anaheim, CA, USA, 11/8/92.

Design and in vivo testing of a permanent implantable left ventricular assist device. / Rosenberg, Gerson; Weiss, William; Snyder, A. J.; Pierce, W. S.

1992 Advances in Bioengineering. Vol. 22 Publ by ASME, 1992. p. 501-504.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Rosenberg G, Weiss W, Snyder AJ, Pierce WS. Design and in vivo testing of a permanent implantable left ventricular assist device. In 1992 Advances in Bioengineering. Vol. 22. Publ by ASME. 1992. p. 501-504