Designing strategies and systems to identify, preserve and promote underutilized indigenous crop species

Ricky M. Bates, T. Gill, A. Bicksler, L. Meitzner Yoder, R. Burnette, V. Ricciardi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Informal seed systems, such as farmer-to-farmer exchanges and farmer self-saved seed, are critical components of resource poor farming systems. This local seed production and distribution facilitates maintenance of crop bio-diversity by preserving in situ locally adapted cultivars and by broadening the genetic base of production with multiple cultivars adapted to specific production systems and micro-climates. They also enhance seed and food security during periods of instability or natural disaster, including changing environmental conditions. A rich diversity of underutilized crop species function within these informal seed systems in Southeast Asia, yet current efforts to conserve, improve, and disseminate indigenous species are failing. A strategy was developed and tested linking an innovative seed bank, local farmers and non-commercial seed traders, with developing markets, supported by accessible information made available through a local outreach network. Impacts included identification of key seed traders and farmers functioning within targeted regions of high species diversity, inventories of important indigenous crop species, documentation of specific indigenous knowledge surrounding the culture of key crops, and expanded exchange and distribution of locally adapted underutilized species. This project paves the way for potential longer term benefits including formation of seed bank-farmer linkages that allow noncommercial seed producers to access new cultivars, hybrids and high-value seed resources not available from traditional sources, development of value chains around key indigenous species, and regional distribution of important seed resources to less developed neighbor nations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationII International Symposium on Underutilized Plant Species
Subtitle of host publicationCrops for the Future - Beyond Food Security
PublisherInternational Society for Horticultural Science
Pages569-576
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9789066052796
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Publication series

NameActa Horticulturae
Volume979
ISSN (Print)0567-7572

Fingerprint

preserves
crops
seeds
farmers
buried seeds
cultivars
indigenous species
taxonomic keys
outreach
indigenous knowledge
seed crop production
disasters
supply chain
microclimate
South East Asia
food security
developed countries
genetic background
linkage (genetics)
production technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Horticulture

Cite this

Bates, R. M., Gill, T., Bicksler, A., Meitzner Yoder, L., Burnette, R., & Ricciardi, V. (2013). Designing strategies and systems to identify, preserve and promote underutilized indigenous crop species. In II International Symposium on Underutilized Plant Species: Crops for the Future - Beyond Food Security (pp. 569-576). (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 979). International Society for Horticultural Science. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.979.61
Bates, Ricky M. ; Gill, T. ; Bicksler, A. ; Meitzner Yoder, L. ; Burnette, R. ; Ricciardi, V. / Designing strategies and systems to identify, preserve and promote underutilized indigenous crop species. II International Symposium on Underutilized Plant Species: Crops for the Future - Beyond Food Security. International Society for Horticultural Science, 2013. pp. 569-576 (Acta Horticulturae).
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Bates, RM, Gill, T, Bicksler, A, Meitzner Yoder, L, Burnette, R & Ricciardi, V 2013, Designing strategies and systems to identify, preserve and promote underutilized indigenous crop species. in II International Symposium on Underutilized Plant Species: Crops for the Future - Beyond Food Security. Acta Horticulturae, vol. 979, International Society for Horticultural Science, pp. 569-576. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.979.61

Designing strategies and systems to identify, preserve and promote underutilized indigenous crop species. / Bates, Ricky M.; Gill, T.; Bicksler, A.; Meitzner Yoder, L.; Burnette, R.; Ricciardi, V.

II International Symposium on Underutilized Plant Species: Crops for the Future - Beyond Food Security. International Society for Horticultural Science, 2013. p. 569-576 (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 979).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Bates RM, Gill T, Bicksler A, Meitzner Yoder L, Burnette R, Ricciardi V. Designing strategies and systems to identify, preserve and promote underutilized indigenous crop species. In II International Symposium on Underutilized Plant Species: Crops for the Future - Beyond Food Security. International Society for Horticultural Science. 2013. p. 569-576. (Acta Horticulturae). https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.979.61