Designing technology for developing nations

Willie K. Ofosu, Austin Asgill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Technology transfer to developing nations has been mainly in the form of finished products such as equipment that are sold to developing nations. These products are designed primarily for applications in the nations that developed the technology, and these nations are mostly in the temperate regions. For this reason, the environmental conditions that are considered as part of the design criteria, and are well suited for the application of the technology, are those of the temperate regions. Many of these equipments operate in remote rural areas where they may remain unattended for significant lengths of time. Some of these environments present extremes of weather conditions during the day and night times. Extreme humidity may also be a factor in the operational environment. While such technology work reasonably well in equatorial regions when they are operated by well trained technicians, technologists, and engineers, incorporating equatorial regional environmental conditions as part of the design criteria may extend the life time of equipment that are intended for use in such regions. It is essential that engineers, technologists and technicians receive an education that includes a consideration the effects of environmental conditions on the proper functioning of technology in developing nations where they may be deployed.. This paper discusses, and presents some efforts that need to be directed at the design of technologies that may be employed in equatorial regions. It also addresses the educational implications that need to be considered for those who may operate and maintain the equipment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - 2006

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Engineers
Technology transfer
Atmospheric humidity
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

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title = "Designing technology for developing nations",
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Designing technology for developing nations. / Ofosu, Willie K.; Asgill, Austin.

In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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