Detecting the presence of a personality disorder using interpersonal and self-dysfunction

Joseph E. Beeney, Sophie A. Lazarus, Michael Nelson Hallquist, Stephanie D. Stepp, Aidan G.C. Wright, Lori N. Scott, Rachel A. Giertych, Paul A. Pilkonis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Calls have increased to place interpersonal and self-disturbance as defining features of personality disorders (PDs). Findings from a methodologically diverse set of studies suggest that a common factor undergirds all PDs. The nature of this core of PDs, however, is not clear. In the current study, interviews were completed for DSM-IV PD diagnosis and interpersonal dysfunction independently with 272 individuals (PD = 191, no-PD = 91). Specifically, we evaluated interpersonal dysfunction across social domains. In addition, we empirically assessed the structure of self-dysfunction in PDs. We found dysfunction in work and romantic domains, and unstable identity uniquely predicted variance in the presence of a PD. Using receiver operating characteristic analysis, we found that the interpersonal dysfunction and self-dysfunction scales each predicted PDs with high accuracy. In combination, the scales resulted in excellent sensitivity (.90) and specificity (.88). The results support interpersonal and self-dysfunction as general factors of PD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-248
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of personality disorders
Volume33
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Personality Disorders
ROC Curve
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Interviews
Sensitivity and Specificity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Beeney, J. E., Lazarus, S. A., Hallquist, M. N., Stepp, S. D., Wright, A. G. C., Scott, L. N., ... Pilkonis, P. A. (2019). Detecting the presence of a personality disorder using interpersonal and self-dysfunction. Journal of personality disorders, 33(2), 229-248.
Beeney, Joseph E. ; Lazarus, Sophie A. ; Hallquist, Michael Nelson ; Stepp, Stephanie D. ; Wright, Aidan G.C. ; Scott, Lori N. ; Giertych, Rachel A. ; Pilkonis, Paul A. / Detecting the presence of a personality disorder using interpersonal and self-dysfunction. In: Journal of personality disorders. 2019 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 229-248.
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Beeney, JE, Lazarus, SA, Hallquist, MN, Stepp, SD, Wright, AGC, Scott, LN, Giertych, RA & Pilkonis, PA 2019, 'Detecting the presence of a personality disorder using interpersonal and self-dysfunction', Journal of personality disorders, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 229-248.

Detecting the presence of a personality disorder using interpersonal and self-dysfunction. / Beeney, Joseph E.; Lazarus, Sophie A.; Hallquist, Michael Nelson; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Scott, Lori N.; Giertych, Rachel A.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

In: Journal of personality disorders, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 229-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Beeney JE, Lazarus SA, Hallquist MN, Stepp SD, Wright AGC, Scott LN et al. Detecting the presence of a personality disorder using interpersonal and self-dysfunction. Journal of personality disorders. 2019 Apr 1;33(2):229-248.