Detection of changes in naturalistic scenes: Comparisons of individuals with and without mental retardation

Michael T. Carlin, Sal A. Soraci, Christina P. Strawbridge, Nancy Dennis, Raquel Loiselle, Nicholas A. Chechile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abilities of individuals with and without mental retardation to search for and detect salient changes to naturalistic scenes were investigated using the flicker paradigm. Located in areas of central or marginal interest, changes involved an object's color, shape, or presence. Individuals with mental retardation required more time to detect changes of all types, and the magnitude of the group difference was more pronounced for marginal-interest changes. Supplemental eye-tracking data from 6 participants suggested that the basis of this effect was that individuals with mental retardation tended to maintain gaze in the region of central interest for longer periods of time prior to sampling the other areas of the scene. Implications for intelligence-related differences in visual attention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-193+217
JournalAmerican Journal on Mental Retardation
Volume108
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Rehabilitation
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Health Professions(all)

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