Determinants of citizens’ attitudes toward police:Results of the Harrisburg Citizen Survey – 1999

Barbara Sims, Michael Hooper, Steven Ames Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The essence of community policing is a policecommunity partnership for identifying, prioritizing and resolving citizen problems. The nature of community policing demands that attention be paid to public expectations of police, and implies listening to citizens and taking their problems seriously. A critical precursor to community policing is identifying citizens’ perceptions of police and their local neighborhoods. This paper presents findings from the Harrisburg Citizen Survey – 1999, in which citizens were asked a series of questions regarding their attitudes toward their local police, their fear of crime, and their perceptions of physical and social incivilities in their neighborhoods. The overall research question for the paper is “Can attitudes toward police be predicted by citizens’ perceptions of physical and social incivilities, their fear of crime, and contact with police, controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, household income, and level of education?”.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-471
Number of pages15
JournalPolicing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2002

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Police
police
determinants
citizen
Social Perception
Crime
Fear
offense
anxiety
community
household income
level of education
Surveys and Questionnaires
Education
ethnicity
contact
Research
gender

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

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Determinants of citizens’ attitudes toward police:Results of the Harrisburg Citizen Survey – 1999. / Sims, Barbara; Hooper, Michael; Peterson, Steven Ames.

In: Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.09.2002, p. 457-471.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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