Determinants of decline in resting metabolic rate in aging females

E. T. Poehlman, M. I. Goran, Andrew Gardner, P. A. Ades, P. J. Arciero, S. M. Katzman- Rooks, S. M. Montgomery, M. J. Toth, P. T. Sutherland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

132 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We considered the association of several metabolic and lifestyle variables as modulators of the decline in resting metabolic rate (RMR) and fat-free weight (FFW) in 183 healthy females (18-81 yr); RMR showed a curvilinear decline with age, which was significant in women aged 51-81 yr but not in women aged 18-50 yr. FFW showed a curvilinear decline with age, which was significant (P < 0.01) in women 48-81 yr but not in women 18-47 yr. The decline in RMR was primarily associated with the loss of FFW (r2 = 72%), whereas the decline in FFW was explained primarily by differences in maximal O2 consumption (V̇O(2 max)), age, leisure time physical activity, and dietary protein intake (total r2 = 46%). We conclude that RMR and FFW showed a curvilinear decline with age which was accelerated beyond the middle-age years. Second, the age-related decline in RMR was primarily associated with the loss of FFW. Third, the loss of FFW was partially related to a decrement in V̇(2 max) and nutritional factors. Therapeutic interventions designed to increase V̇O(2 max) by elevating physical activity may preserve fat-free weight and thus offset the decline of RMR in aging women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume264
Issue number3 27-3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Fingerprint

Basal Metabolism
Aging of materials
Fats
Weights and Measures
Exercise
Dietary Proteins
Leisure Activities
Modulators
Life Style

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Poehlman, E. T., Goran, M. I., Gardner, A., Ades, P. A., Arciero, P. J., Katzman- Rooks, S. M., ... Sutherland, P. T. (1993). Determinants of decline in resting metabolic rate in aging females. American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, 264(3 27-3).
Poehlman, E. T. ; Goran, M. I. ; Gardner, Andrew ; Ades, P. A. ; Arciero, P. J. ; Katzman- Rooks, S. M. ; Montgomery, S. M. ; Toth, M. J. ; Sutherland, P. T. / Determinants of decline in resting metabolic rate in aging females. In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1993 ; Vol. 264, No. 3 27-3.
@article{a0e7317386b54bcca5bfb2e0eec19161,
title = "Determinants of decline in resting metabolic rate in aging females",
abstract = "We considered the association of several metabolic and lifestyle variables as modulators of the decline in resting metabolic rate (RMR) and fat-free weight (FFW) in 183 healthy females (18-81 yr); RMR showed a curvilinear decline with age, which was significant in women aged 51-81 yr but not in women aged 18-50 yr. FFW showed a curvilinear decline with age, which was significant (P < 0.01) in women 48-81 yr but not in women 18-47 yr. The decline in RMR was primarily associated with the loss of FFW (r2 = 72{\%}), whereas the decline in FFW was explained primarily by differences in maximal O2 consumption (V̇O(2 max)), age, leisure time physical activity, and dietary protein intake (total r2 = 46{\%}). We conclude that RMR and FFW showed a curvilinear decline with age which was accelerated beyond the middle-age years. Second, the age-related decline in RMR was primarily associated with the loss of FFW. Third, the loss of FFW was partially related to a decrement in V̇(2 max) and nutritional factors. Therapeutic interventions designed to increase V̇O(2 max) by elevating physical activity may preserve fat-free weight and thus offset the decline of RMR in aging women.",
author = "Poehlman, {E. T.} and Goran, {M. I.} and Andrew Gardner and Ades, {P. A.} and Arciero, {P. J.} and {Katzman- Rooks}, {S. M.} and Montgomery, {S. M.} and Toth, {M. J.} and Sutherland, {P. T.}",
year = "1993",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "264",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0193-1849",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "3 27-3",

}

Poehlman, ET, Goran, MI, Gardner, A, Ades, PA, Arciero, PJ, Katzman- Rooks, SM, Montgomery, SM, Toth, MJ & Sutherland, PT 1993, 'Determinants of decline in resting metabolic rate in aging females', American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 264, no. 3 27-3.

Determinants of decline in resting metabolic rate in aging females. / Poehlman, E. T.; Goran, M. I.; Gardner, Andrew; Ades, P. A.; Arciero, P. J.; Katzman- Rooks, S. M.; Montgomery, S. M.; Toth, M. J.; Sutherland, P. T.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 264, No. 3 27-3, 01.01.1993.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Determinants of decline in resting metabolic rate in aging females

AU - Poehlman, E. T.

AU - Goran, M. I.

AU - Gardner, Andrew

AU - Ades, P. A.

AU - Arciero, P. J.

AU - Katzman- Rooks, S. M.

AU - Montgomery, S. M.

AU - Toth, M. J.

AU - Sutherland, P. T.

PY - 1993/1/1

Y1 - 1993/1/1

N2 - We considered the association of several metabolic and lifestyle variables as modulators of the decline in resting metabolic rate (RMR) and fat-free weight (FFW) in 183 healthy females (18-81 yr); RMR showed a curvilinear decline with age, which was significant in women aged 51-81 yr but not in women aged 18-50 yr. FFW showed a curvilinear decline with age, which was significant (P < 0.01) in women 48-81 yr but not in women 18-47 yr. The decline in RMR was primarily associated with the loss of FFW (r2 = 72%), whereas the decline in FFW was explained primarily by differences in maximal O2 consumption (V̇O(2 max)), age, leisure time physical activity, and dietary protein intake (total r2 = 46%). We conclude that RMR and FFW showed a curvilinear decline with age which was accelerated beyond the middle-age years. Second, the age-related decline in RMR was primarily associated with the loss of FFW. Third, the loss of FFW was partially related to a decrement in V̇(2 max) and nutritional factors. Therapeutic interventions designed to increase V̇O(2 max) by elevating physical activity may preserve fat-free weight and thus offset the decline of RMR in aging women.

AB - We considered the association of several metabolic and lifestyle variables as modulators of the decline in resting metabolic rate (RMR) and fat-free weight (FFW) in 183 healthy females (18-81 yr); RMR showed a curvilinear decline with age, which was significant in women aged 51-81 yr but not in women aged 18-50 yr. FFW showed a curvilinear decline with age, which was significant (P < 0.01) in women 48-81 yr but not in women 18-47 yr. The decline in RMR was primarily associated with the loss of FFW (r2 = 72%), whereas the decline in FFW was explained primarily by differences in maximal O2 consumption (V̇O(2 max)), age, leisure time physical activity, and dietary protein intake (total r2 = 46%). We conclude that RMR and FFW showed a curvilinear decline with age which was accelerated beyond the middle-age years. Second, the age-related decline in RMR was primarily associated with the loss of FFW. Third, the loss of FFW was partially related to a decrement in V̇(2 max) and nutritional factors. Therapeutic interventions designed to increase V̇O(2 max) by elevating physical activity may preserve fat-free weight and thus offset the decline of RMR in aging women.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027409115&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027409115&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8460693

AN - SCOPUS:0027409115

VL - 264

JO - American Journal of Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology

SN - 0193-1849

IS - 3 27-3

ER -

Poehlman ET, Goran MI, Gardner A, Ades PA, Arciero PJ, Katzman- Rooks SM et al. Determinants of decline in resting metabolic rate in aging females. American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1993 Jan 1;264(3 27-3).