Determinants of export intensity in emerging markets: An upper echelon perspective

Arpita Agnihotri, Saurabh Bhattacharya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using India as an example, this article extends the application of upper echelon theory to emerging markets to consider the effects on firms' export intensity. Five characteristics of top management teams that influence a firm's export intensity were analyzed-educational level, functional heterogeneity, international exposure, age, and length of tenure with their current firm. The time period studied was 2007-2012, with a focus on these industries: rapidly changing consumer goods, automobiles, pharmaceuticals, and textiles. Most of the study's hypotheses were supported, and some of the results obtained differ from those found previously for developed markets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number747
Pages (from-to)687-695
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of World Business
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Fingerprint

Emerging markets
Export intensity
Pharmaceuticals
Top management teams
Educational level
India
Automobile
Industry
Tenure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Finance
  • Marketing

Cite this

@article{dc83413c59f74705883f8ce9b8da5b4e,
title = "Determinants of export intensity in emerging markets: An upper echelon perspective",
abstract = "Using India as an example, this article extends the application of upper echelon theory to emerging markets to consider the effects on firms' export intensity. Five characteristics of top management teams that influence a firm's export intensity were analyzed-educational level, functional heterogeneity, international exposure, age, and length of tenure with their current firm. The time period studied was 2007-2012, with a focus on these industries: rapidly changing consumer goods, automobiles, pharmaceuticals, and textiles. Most of the study's hypotheses were supported, and some of the results obtained differ from those found previously for developed markets.",
author = "Arpita Agnihotri and Saurabh Bhattacharya",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jwb.2014.11.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "687--695",
journal = "Journal of World Business",
issn = "1090-9516",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "4",

}

Determinants of export intensity in emerging markets : An upper echelon perspective. / Agnihotri, Arpita; Bhattacharya, Saurabh.

In: Journal of World Business, Vol. 50, No. 4, 747, 01.10.2015, p. 687-695.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Determinants of export intensity in emerging markets

T2 - An upper echelon perspective

AU - Agnihotri, Arpita

AU - Bhattacharya, Saurabh

PY - 2015/10/1

Y1 - 2015/10/1

N2 - Using India as an example, this article extends the application of upper echelon theory to emerging markets to consider the effects on firms' export intensity. Five characteristics of top management teams that influence a firm's export intensity were analyzed-educational level, functional heterogeneity, international exposure, age, and length of tenure with their current firm. The time period studied was 2007-2012, with a focus on these industries: rapidly changing consumer goods, automobiles, pharmaceuticals, and textiles. Most of the study's hypotheses were supported, and some of the results obtained differ from those found previously for developed markets.

AB - Using India as an example, this article extends the application of upper echelon theory to emerging markets to consider the effects on firms' export intensity. Five characteristics of top management teams that influence a firm's export intensity were analyzed-educational level, functional heterogeneity, international exposure, age, and length of tenure with their current firm. The time period studied was 2007-2012, with a focus on these industries: rapidly changing consumer goods, automobiles, pharmaceuticals, and textiles. Most of the study's hypotheses were supported, and some of the results obtained differ from those found previously for developed markets.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84941635219&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84941635219&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jwb.2014.11.001

DO - 10.1016/j.jwb.2014.11.001

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84941635219

VL - 50

SP - 687

EP - 695

JO - Journal of World Business

JF - Journal of World Business

SN - 1090-9516

IS - 4

M1 - 747

ER -