Determinants of transmission success of individual clones from mixed- clone infections of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi

L. H. Taylor, A. F. Read

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Interactions between malaria parasite clones within mixed infections can have a profound effect on transmission and therefore the epidemiology of the disease. However, factors which determine the relative transmission success of individual clones from mixed infections are unknown. We have used two clones of the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi to investigate changes in the clonal composition of asexual parasites over the course of mixed-clone infections in mice and how these relate to the clonal composition of transmission (oocyst) populations in mosquitoes. Clonal composition was determined using monoclonal antibody analyses for the asexual blood stage populations and PCR analysis of single oocysts for the transmission populations in mosquitoes. The relative frequency of the two clones changed dramatically during the course of the infection in mice, depending on their ratio in the inoculum. The clonal composition of parasites within mosquitoes most closely resembled that in the asexual infection at the time of transmission rather than that at any point earlier in the infection. These results provide no evidence that clones increase rates of gametocytogenesis in response to competitive suppression. Most likely, transmission success follows from asexual success in the later parts of the infection. The clone which dominated the earlier part of the infection, when most parasites are produced, did not necessarily dominate the transmission from the infection. The two clones differed in competitive ability and the data suggest that interactions with the host immune system may be a major factor in determining transmission success from mixed-clone infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)719-725
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal for Parasitology
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 12 1998

Fingerprint

Plasmodium chabaudi
Coinfection
Malaria
Rodentia
Parasites
Clone Cells
Culicidae
Infection
Oocysts
Population
Infectious Disease Transmission
Immune System
Epidemiology
Monoclonal Antibodies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{b96c484b0343407a9366efab4e946ec0,
title = "Determinants of transmission success of individual clones from mixed- clone infections of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi",
abstract = "Interactions between malaria parasite clones within mixed infections can have a profound effect on transmission and therefore the epidemiology of the disease. However, factors which determine the relative transmission success of individual clones from mixed infections are unknown. We have used two clones of the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi to investigate changes in the clonal composition of asexual parasites over the course of mixed-clone infections in mice and how these relate to the clonal composition of transmission (oocyst) populations in mosquitoes. Clonal composition was determined using monoclonal antibody analyses for the asexual blood stage populations and PCR analysis of single oocysts for the transmission populations in mosquitoes. The relative frequency of the two clones changed dramatically during the course of the infection in mice, depending on their ratio in the inoculum. The clonal composition of parasites within mosquitoes most closely resembled that in the asexual infection at the time of transmission rather than that at any point earlier in the infection. These results provide no evidence that clones increase rates of gametocytogenesis in response to competitive suppression. Most likely, transmission success follows from asexual success in the later parts of the infection. The clone which dominated the earlier part of the infection, when most parasites are produced, did not necessarily dominate the transmission from the infection. The two clones differed in competitive ability and the data suggest that interactions with the host immune system may be a major factor in determining transmission success from mixed-clone infections.",
author = "Taylor, {L. H.} and Read, {A. F.}",
year = "1998",
month = "5",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1016/S0020-7519(98)00032-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "719--725",
journal = "International Journal for Parasitology",
issn = "0020-7519",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Determinants of transmission success of individual clones from mixed- clone infections of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi

AU - Taylor, L. H.

AU - Read, A. F.

PY - 1998/5/12

Y1 - 1998/5/12

N2 - Interactions between malaria parasite clones within mixed infections can have a profound effect on transmission and therefore the epidemiology of the disease. However, factors which determine the relative transmission success of individual clones from mixed infections are unknown. We have used two clones of the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi to investigate changes in the clonal composition of asexual parasites over the course of mixed-clone infections in mice and how these relate to the clonal composition of transmission (oocyst) populations in mosquitoes. Clonal composition was determined using monoclonal antibody analyses for the asexual blood stage populations and PCR analysis of single oocysts for the transmission populations in mosquitoes. The relative frequency of the two clones changed dramatically during the course of the infection in mice, depending on their ratio in the inoculum. The clonal composition of parasites within mosquitoes most closely resembled that in the asexual infection at the time of transmission rather than that at any point earlier in the infection. These results provide no evidence that clones increase rates of gametocytogenesis in response to competitive suppression. Most likely, transmission success follows from asexual success in the later parts of the infection. The clone which dominated the earlier part of the infection, when most parasites are produced, did not necessarily dominate the transmission from the infection. The two clones differed in competitive ability and the data suggest that interactions with the host immune system may be a major factor in determining transmission success from mixed-clone infections.

AB - Interactions between malaria parasite clones within mixed infections can have a profound effect on transmission and therefore the epidemiology of the disease. However, factors which determine the relative transmission success of individual clones from mixed infections are unknown. We have used two clones of the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi to investigate changes in the clonal composition of asexual parasites over the course of mixed-clone infections in mice and how these relate to the clonal composition of transmission (oocyst) populations in mosquitoes. Clonal composition was determined using monoclonal antibody analyses for the asexual blood stage populations and PCR analysis of single oocysts for the transmission populations in mosquitoes. The relative frequency of the two clones changed dramatically during the course of the infection in mice, depending on their ratio in the inoculum. The clonal composition of parasites within mosquitoes most closely resembled that in the asexual infection at the time of transmission rather than that at any point earlier in the infection. These results provide no evidence that clones increase rates of gametocytogenesis in response to competitive suppression. Most likely, transmission success follows from asexual success in the later parts of the infection. The clone which dominated the earlier part of the infection, when most parasites are produced, did not necessarily dominate the transmission from the infection. The two clones differed in competitive ability and the data suggest that interactions with the host immune system may be a major factor in determining transmission success from mixed-clone infections.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031860082&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031860082&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0020-7519(98)00032-0

DO - 10.1016/S0020-7519(98)00032-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 9650051

AN - SCOPUS:0031860082

VL - 28

SP - 719

EP - 725

JO - International Journal for Parasitology

JF - International Journal for Parasitology

SN - 0020-7519

IS - 5

ER -