Determining the cause of recurrent wheezing in infants

Tracy Fausnight, Deborah A. Gentile, David P. Skoner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Although the most common cause of wheezing in infants is asthma, other causes should be considered. The differential diagnosis includes foreign-body aspiration, vascular rings, laryngotracheobronchomalacia, bronchiolitis, cystic fibrosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and gastroesophageal reflux. A sudden onset of wheezing, choking, or coughing suggests foreign-body aspiration, while persistent stridor that was present at birth may indicate laryngeal webs. The presence of cough, fever, and rhinitis is consistent with bronchiolitis. Selected tests, such as chest radiography, bronchoscopy, barium esophagography, laryngoscopy, airway fluoroscopy, endoscopy, CT, and biopsy, can help confirm the diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-131
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Respiratory Diseases - For Pediatricians
Volume4
Issue number4
StatePublished - Nov 2002

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Respiratory Sounds
Bronchiolitis
Foreign Bodies
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Laryngoscopy
Fluoroscopy
Bronchoscopy
Airway Obstruction
Barium
Rhinitis
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Cough
Cystic Fibrosis
Radiography
Endoscopy
Blood Vessels
Differential Diagnosis
Fever
Thorax
Asthma

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Fausnight, Tracy ; Gentile, Deborah A. ; Skoner, David P. / Determining the cause of recurrent wheezing in infants. In: Journal of Respiratory Diseases - For Pediatricians. 2002 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 126-131.
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Determining the cause of recurrent wheezing in infants. / Fausnight, Tracy; Gentile, Deborah A.; Skoner, David P.

In: Journal of Respiratory Diseases - For Pediatricians, Vol. 4, No. 4, 11.2002, p. 126-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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