Development and application of multiple-input models for structural noise source identification of forge hammers. Part II—Application

Martin Wesley Trethewey, Harold A. Evensen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The application of multiple-input models to analyze structurally generated noise from a forge hammer is discussed. Part I of this article presented the rationale for developing and interpreting multiple-input models for structural noise source identification. An investigation of the transducer requirements for characterizing the sound radiation from a monolithic element showed that a single, well-placed accelerometer may be sufficient for each element. Part II of this article analyzes the application of the multiple-input modeling technique to the structural noise source identification of a Chambersburg #8 die forger. A comparison of three-, five-, and seven-input models applied to the forge hammer under production conditions indicates that as few as five transducers would suffice to characterize the sound contributions of the five structural elements. Analysis of these models indicates that the ram is the dominant source of sound energy, the columns are secondary sources, and the yoke and anvil are minor sources when detected through a microphone at the operator's position. The analysis also shows that the coupling between the hammer structural elements is sufficient to render conventional wrapping identification methods unreliable for analyzing hammer noise.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1099-1104
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
    Volume75
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

    Fingerprint

    hammers
    acoustics
    transducers
    ram
    accelerometers
    anvils
    microphones
    Forge
    operators
    requirements
    radiation
    Sound

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

    Cite this

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    abstract = "The application of multiple-input models to analyze structurally generated noise from a forge hammer is discussed. Part I of this article presented the rationale for developing and interpreting multiple-input models for structural noise source identification. An investigation of the transducer requirements for characterizing the sound radiation from a monolithic element showed that a single, well-placed accelerometer may be sufficient for each element. Part II of this article analyzes the application of the multiple-input modeling technique to the structural noise source identification of a Chambersburg #8 die forger. A comparison of three-, five-, and seven-input models applied to the forge hammer under production conditions indicates that as few as five transducers would suffice to characterize the sound contributions of the five structural elements. Analysis of these models indicates that the ram is the dominant source of sound energy, the columns are secondary sources, and the yoke and anvil are minor sources when detected through a microphone at the operator's position. The analysis also shows that the coupling between the hammer structural elements is sufficient to render conventional wrapping identification methods unreliable for analyzing hammer noise.",
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    AU - Evensen, Harold A.

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    N2 - The application of multiple-input models to analyze structurally generated noise from a forge hammer is discussed. Part I of this article presented the rationale for developing and interpreting multiple-input models for structural noise source identification. An investigation of the transducer requirements for characterizing the sound radiation from a monolithic element showed that a single, well-placed accelerometer may be sufficient for each element. Part II of this article analyzes the application of the multiple-input modeling technique to the structural noise source identification of a Chambersburg #8 die forger. A comparison of three-, five-, and seven-input models applied to the forge hammer under production conditions indicates that as few as five transducers would suffice to characterize the sound contributions of the five structural elements. Analysis of these models indicates that the ram is the dominant source of sound energy, the columns are secondary sources, and the yoke and anvil are minor sources when detected through a microphone at the operator's position. The analysis also shows that the coupling between the hammer structural elements is sufficient to render conventional wrapping identification methods unreliable for analyzing hammer noise.

    AB - The application of multiple-input models to analyze structurally generated noise from a forge hammer is discussed. Part I of this article presented the rationale for developing and interpreting multiple-input models for structural noise source identification. An investigation of the transducer requirements for characterizing the sound radiation from a monolithic element showed that a single, well-placed accelerometer may be sufficient for each element. Part II of this article analyzes the application of the multiple-input modeling technique to the structural noise source identification of a Chambersburg #8 die forger. A comparison of three-, five-, and seven-input models applied to the forge hammer under production conditions indicates that as few as five transducers would suffice to characterize the sound contributions of the five structural elements. Analysis of these models indicates that the ram is the dominant source of sound energy, the columns are secondary sources, and the yoke and anvil are minor sources when detected through a microphone at the operator's position. The analysis also shows that the coupling between the hammer structural elements is sufficient to render conventional wrapping identification methods unreliable for analyzing hammer noise.

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