Development and implementation of a "counter-top" training program to increase retention of food safety knowledge, alter behavior, improve attitude and increase skills of spanishspeaking retail employees

A. E. Richard, J. L. Brown, R. B. Radhakrishna, E. P. Yoder, S. Nieto-Montenegro, C. N. Cutter

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Foodborne illness is a concern that is compounded by lack of food safety training, cultural differences, and language barriers in foodservice industries. Needs assessments of Spanish-speaking food handlers from Reading, PA, were conducted by concealed-direct observations, collection of demographic data (gender, country of origin, years of school completed, age in years, years worked in a retail setting, years owning a store, number of employees at this store; part-time or full-time, and number of different customers per week) and manager preference of training surveys The results assisted in the development of a customized "counter-top" food safety training program that addressed common food safety issues occurring in small meat shops, known as carnicerias. Training was designed to increase retention of food safety knowledge, improve attitude, alter behavior, and increase skills of Spanish-speaking employees. The inclusion criteria required establishments have a meat display case, a meat slicer, employees >18 years of age, and employees whose first language was Spanish. Twenty carnicerias were assigned to two treatments groups control (no training) or face-to-face (FTF) training. The FTF training included four food safety assessments: knowledge, attitude, behavior, and a skill performance Assessments were given pre-training, post-training, and delayed-post training. ANCOVA for knowledge and skill results demonstrated a significant difference in post-test and delayed post-test scores when controlling for the pre-test scores of the FTF-trained group. Findings demonstrated that while food safety attitude and behavior changes were not changed significantly, improvements were observed in food safety knowledge and skill. This type of training program could impact establishments positively to improve food safety practices of Spanish-speaking employees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10-19
Number of pages10
JournalFood Protection Trends
Volume33
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Food Safety
education programs
human resources
food safety
Education
food safety education
meat
Meat
cultural differences
needs assessment
food handling
safety assessment
food service
testing
behavior change
foodborne illness
Communication Barriers
Foodborne Diseases
Needs Assessment
Retention (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{a14aa2aa780548dfb78180b66e371d54,
title = "Development and implementation of a {"}counter-top{"} training program to increase retention of food safety knowledge, alter behavior, improve attitude and increase skills of spanishspeaking retail employees",
abstract = "Foodborne illness is a concern that is compounded by lack of food safety training, cultural differences, and language barriers in foodservice industries. Needs assessments of Spanish-speaking food handlers from Reading, PA, were conducted by concealed-direct observations, collection of demographic data (gender, country of origin, years of school completed, age in years, years worked in a retail setting, years owning a store, number of employees at this store; part-time or full-time, and number of different customers per week) and manager preference of training surveys The results assisted in the development of a customized {"}counter-top{"} food safety training program that addressed common food safety issues occurring in small meat shops, known as carnicerias. Training was designed to increase retention of food safety knowledge, improve attitude, alter behavior, and increase skills of Spanish-speaking employees. The inclusion criteria required establishments have a meat display case, a meat slicer, employees >18 years of age, and employees whose first language was Spanish. Twenty carnicerias were assigned to two treatments groups control (no training) or face-to-face (FTF) training. The FTF training included four food safety assessments: knowledge, attitude, behavior, and a skill performance Assessments were given pre-training, post-training, and delayed-post training. ANCOVA for knowledge and skill results demonstrated a significant difference in post-test and delayed post-test scores when controlling for the pre-test scores of the FTF-trained group. Findings demonstrated that while food safety attitude and behavior changes were not changed significantly, improvements were observed in food safety knowledge and skill. This type of training program could impact establishments positively to improve food safety practices of Spanish-speaking employees.",
author = "Richard, {A. E.} and Brown, {J. L.} and Radhakrishna, {R. B.} and Yoder, {E. P.} and S. Nieto-Montenegro and Cutter, {C. N.}",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "10--19",
journal = "Food Protection Trends",
issn = "1541-9576",
publisher = "International Association for Food Protection",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Development and implementation of a "counter-top" training program to increase retention of food safety knowledge, alter behavior, improve attitude and increase skills of spanishspeaking retail employees

AU - Richard, A. E.

AU - Brown, J. L.

AU - Radhakrishna, R. B.

AU - Yoder, E. P.

AU - Nieto-Montenegro, S.

AU - Cutter, C. N.

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - Foodborne illness is a concern that is compounded by lack of food safety training, cultural differences, and language barriers in foodservice industries. Needs assessments of Spanish-speaking food handlers from Reading, PA, were conducted by concealed-direct observations, collection of demographic data (gender, country of origin, years of school completed, age in years, years worked in a retail setting, years owning a store, number of employees at this store; part-time or full-time, and number of different customers per week) and manager preference of training surveys The results assisted in the development of a customized "counter-top" food safety training program that addressed common food safety issues occurring in small meat shops, known as carnicerias. Training was designed to increase retention of food safety knowledge, improve attitude, alter behavior, and increase skills of Spanish-speaking employees. The inclusion criteria required establishments have a meat display case, a meat slicer, employees >18 years of age, and employees whose first language was Spanish. Twenty carnicerias were assigned to two treatments groups control (no training) or face-to-face (FTF) training. The FTF training included four food safety assessments: knowledge, attitude, behavior, and a skill performance Assessments were given pre-training, post-training, and delayed-post training. ANCOVA for knowledge and skill results demonstrated a significant difference in post-test and delayed post-test scores when controlling for the pre-test scores of the FTF-trained group. Findings demonstrated that while food safety attitude and behavior changes were not changed significantly, improvements were observed in food safety knowledge and skill. This type of training program could impact establishments positively to improve food safety practices of Spanish-speaking employees.

AB - Foodborne illness is a concern that is compounded by lack of food safety training, cultural differences, and language barriers in foodservice industries. Needs assessments of Spanish-speaking food handlers from Reading, PA, were conducted by concealed-direct observations, collection of demographic data (gender, country of origin, years of school completed, age in years, years worked in a retail setting, years owning a store, number of employees at this store; part-time or full-time, and number of different customers per week) and manager preference of training surveys The results assisted in the development of a customized "counter-top" food safety training program that addressed common food safety issues occurring in small meat shops, known as carnicerias. Training was designed to increase retention of food safety knowledge, improve attitude, alter behavior, and increase skills of Spanish-speaking employees. The inclusion criteria required establishments have a meat display case, a meat slicer, employees >18 years of age, and employees whose first language was Spanish. Twenty carnicerias were assigned to two treatments groups control (no training) or face-to-face (FTF) training. The FTF training included four food safety assessments: knowledge, attitude, behavior, and a skill performance Assessments were given pre-training, post-training, and delayed-post training. ANCOVA for knowledge and skill results demonstrated a significant difference in post-test and delayed post-test scores when controlling for the pre-test scores of the FTF-trained group. Findings demonstrated that while food safety attitude and behavior changes were not changed significantly, improvements were observed in food safety knowledge and skill. This type of training program could impact establishments positively to improve food safety practices of Spanish-speaking employees.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84893327916&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84893327916&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:84893327916

VL - 33

SP - 10

EP - 19

JO - Food Protection Trends

JF - Food Protection Trends

SN - 1541-9576

IS - 1

ER -