Development and initial feedback about a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine comic book for adolescents

Mira L. Katz, Benjamin R. Oldach, Jennifer Goodwin, Paul L. Reiter, Mack Ruffin, Electra D. Paskett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates do not meet the Healthy People 2020 objective of 80 % coverage among adolescent females. We describe the development and initial feedback about an HPV vaccine comic book for young adolescents. The comic book is one component of a multilevel intervention to improve HPV vaccination rates among adolescents. Parents suggested and provided input into the development of a HPV vaccine comic book. Following the development of the comic book, we conducted a pilot study to obtain initial feedback about the comic book among parents (n=20) and their adolescents ages 9 to 14 (n=17) recruited from a community-based organization. Parents completed a pre-post test including items addressing HPV knowledge, HPV vaccine attitudes, and about the content of the comic book. Adolescents completed a brief interview after reading the comic book. After reading the comic book, HPV knowledge improved (2.7 to 4.6 correct answers on a 0-5 scale; p<0.01) and more positive attitudes toward HPV vaccination (p<0.05) were reported among parents. Parents confirmed that the comic book's content was acceptable and adolescents liked the story, found it easy to read, and thought the comic book was a good way to learn about being healthy. Parents provided valuable information in the development of a theoretically-based comic book and the comic book appears to be an acceptable format for providing HPV vaccine information to adolescents. Future research will include the comic book in an intervention study to improve HPV vaccination rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-324
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Papillomavirus Vaccines
Parents
Vaccination
Reading

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Katz, Mira L. ; Oldach, Benjamin R. ; Goodwin, Jennifer ; Reiter, Paul L. ; Ruffin, Mack ; Paskett, Electra D. / Development and initial feedback about a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine comic book for adolescents. In: Journal of Cancer Education. 2014 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 318-324.
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Development and initial feedback about a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine comic book for adolescents. / Katz, Mira L.; Oldach, Benjamin R.; Goodwin, Jennifer; Reiter, Paul L.; Ruffin, Mack; Paskett, Electra D.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 318-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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