Development of a microreactor as a thermal source for microelectromechanical systems power generation

J. Vican, B. F. Gajdeczko, F. L. Dryer, D. L. Milius, I. A. Aksay, R. A. Yetter

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

179 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An alumina ceramic 12.5 × 12.5 × 5.0 mm microreactor was constructed using a modified stereolith-ography process. The design was based on a "Swiss roll" concept of double spiral-shaped channels to facilitate a high level of heat transfer between the reactants and combustion products and wall surface contact of the flow through the microreactor body. Self-sustained combustion of hydrogen and air mixtures was demonstrated over a wide range of fuel/air mixtures and flow rates for equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 1.0 and chemical energy inputs from 2 to 16 W. Depositing platinum on gamma alumina on the internal walls enabled catalytic ignition at or near room temperature and self-sustained operation at temperatures to 300 °C. Catalyst degradation was observed at higher operating temperatures and reignition capabilities were lost. However, sustained operation could be obtained at wall temperatures in excess of 300 °C, apparently stabilized by a combination of surface and gas-phase reaction phenomena. A global energy balance model was developed to analyze overall reactor performance characteristics. The reactor design and operating temperature range have potential applications as a heat source for thermoelectric and pyroelectric power generation at small scales compatible with microelectromechanical systems applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)909-916
Number of pages8
JournalProceedings of the Combustion Institute
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Event30th International Symposium on Combustion - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Jul 25 2004Jul 30 2004

Fingerprint

operating temperature
ignition
microelectromechanical systems
MEMS
Power generation
aluminum oxides
reactor design
chemical energy
combustion products
air
wall temperature
heat sources
Aluminum Oxide
equivalence
platinum
flow velocity
heat transfer
reactors
ceramics
vapor phases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Vican, J. ; Gajdeczko, B. F. ; Dryer, F. L. ; Milius, D. L. ; Aksay, I. A. ; Yetter, R. A. / Development of a microreactor as a thermal source for microelectromechanical systems power generation. In: Proceedings of the Combustion Institute. 2002 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 909-916.
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Development of a microreactor as a thermal source for microelectromechanical systems power generation. / Vican, J.; Gajdeczko, B. F.; Dryer, F. L.; Milius, D. L.; Aksay, I. A.; Yetter, R. A.

In: Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.01.2002, p. 909-916.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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AU - Gajdeczko, B. F.

AU - Dryer, F. L.

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AU - Aksay, I. A.

AU - Yetter, R. A.

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