Development of animal models against emerging coronaviruses

From SARS to MERS coronavirus

Troy Sutton, Kanta Subbarao

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two novel coronaviruses have emerged to cause severe disease in humans. While bats may be the primary reservoir for both viruses, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) likely crossed into humans from civets in China, and MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has been transmitted from camels in the Middle East. Unlike SARS-CoV that resolved within a year, continued introductions of MERS-CoV present an on-going public health threat. Animal models are needed to evaluate countermeasures against emerging viruses. With SARS-CoV, several animal species were permissive to infection. In contrast, most laboratory animals are refractory or only semi-permissive to infection with MERS-CoV. This host-range restriction is largely determined by sequence heterogeneity in the MERS-CoV receptor. We describe animal models developed to study coronaviruses, with a focus on host-range restriction at the level of the viral receptor and discuss approaches to consider in developing a model to evaluate countermeasures against MERS-CoV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-258
Number of pages12
JournalVirology
Volume479-480
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

SARS Virus
Coronavirus
Animal Models
Host Specificity
Viruses
Viverridae
Camelus
Middle East
Laboratory Animals
Infection
China
Public Health
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Virology

Cite this

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title = "Development of animal models against emerging coronaviruses: From SARS to MERS coronavirus",
abstract = "Two novel coronaviruses have emerged to cause severe disease in humans. While bats may be the primary reservoir for both viruses, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) likely crossed into humans from civets in China, and MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has been transmitted from camels in the Middle East. Unlike SARS-CoV that resolved within a year, continued introductions of MERS-CoV present an on-going public health threat. Animal models are needed to evaluate countermeasures against emerging viruses. With SARS-CoV, several animal species were permissive to infection. In contrast, most laboratory animals are refractory or only semi-permissive to infection with MERS-CoV. This host-range restriction is largely determined by sequence heterogeneity in the MERS-CoV receptor. We describe animal models developed to study coronaviruses, with a focus on host-range restriction at the level of the viral receptor and discuss approaches to consider in developing a model to evaluate countermeasures against MERS-CoV.",
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Development of animal models against emerging coronaviruses : From SARS to MERS coronavirus. / Sutton, Troy; Subbarao, Kanta.

In: Virology, Vol. 479-480, 01.05.2015, p. 247-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Development of animal models against emerging coronaviruses

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AU - Sutton, Troy

AU - Subbarao, Kanta

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