Development of gender attitude traditionality across middle childhood and adolescence

Ann C. Crouter, Shawn D. Whiteman, Susan Marie McHale, D. Wayne Osgood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of gender attitudes in 402 youth (201 firstborn and 201 secondborn siblings) in 201 European American families was examined using data collected on seven occasions across 9 years. Pooling across siblings and using multilevel modeling, we examined gender attitude development from ages 7 to 19. Consistent with an ecological perspective, the combined effects of individual (i.e., sex, age, birth order) and contextual (i.e., parents' gender attitudes, sibling sex) characteristics predicted patterns of change. Although most youth declined in traditionality, the attitudes of firstborn boys with brothers and traditional parents became more traditional over time. No one longitudinal pattern captured the development of gender attitudes; trajectories varied as a function of contextual and personal characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)911-926
Number of pages16
JournalChild development
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

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adolescence
childhood
Siblings
gender
reproductive behavior
parents
Parents
birth order
Birth Order
Sex Characteristics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Crouter, Ann C. ; Whiteman, Shawn D. ; McHale, Susan Marie ; Osgood, D. Wayne. / Development of gender attitude traditionality across middle childhood and adolescence. In: Child development. 2007 ; Vol. 78, No. 3. pp. 911-926.
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Development of gender attitude traditionality across middle childhood and adolescence. / Crouter, Ann C.; Whiteman, Shawn D.; McHale, Susan Marie; Osgood, D. Wayne.

In: Child development, Vol. 78, No. 3, 01.05.2007, p. 911-926.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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