Developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use from infancy to late adolescence

Rina Das Eiden, Jared Lessard, Craig R. Colder, Jennifer Livingston, Meghan Casey, Kenneth E. Leonard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use beginning in infancy was examined in a sample of children with alcoholic and nonalcoholic parents. The model examined the role of parents' alcohol diagnoses, depression and antisocial behavior in a cascading process of risk via 3 major hypothesized pathways: first, via parental warmth/sensitivity from toddler to kindergarten age predicting higher parental monitoring in middle childhood through early adolescence, serving as a protective pathway for adolescent substance use; second, via child low self-regulation in the preschool years to a continuing externalizing behavior problem pathway leading to underage drinking and higher engagement with substance using peers; and third, via higher social competence from kindergarten age through middle childhood being protective against engagement with delinquent and substance using peers, and leading to lower adolescent substance use. The sample consisted of 227 intact families recruited from the community at 12 months of child age. Results were supportive for the first 2 pathways to substance use in late adolescence. Among proximal, early adolescent risks, engagement with delinquent peers and parent's acceptance of underage drinking were significant predictors of late adolescent alcohol and marijuana use. The results highlight the important protective roles of maternal warmth/sensitivity in early childhood to kindergarten age, parental monitoring in middle childhood, and of child self-regulation in the preschool period as reducing risk for externalizing behavior problems, underage drinking, and engagement with delinquent peers in early adolescence. Specific implications for the creation of developmentally fine-tuned preventive intervention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1619-1633
Number of pages15
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume52
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

adolescence
underage
adolescent
childhood
kindergarten
parents
Parents
self-regulation
alcohol
monitoring
social competence
alcoholism
acceptance
Cannabis
Risk-Taking
Alcohols
Mothers
Depression
community
Underage Drinking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Das Eiden, Rina ; Lessard, Jared ; Colder, Craig R. ; Livingston, Jennifer ; Casey, Meghan ; Leonard, Kenneth E. / Developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use from infancy to late adolescence. In: Developmental psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 52, No. 10. pp. 1619-1633.
@article{baa47f7f3edb42eb9a6c4a1bec59660a,
title = "Developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use from infancy to late adolescence",
abstract = "A developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use beginning in infancy was examined in a sample of children with alcoholic and nonalcoholic parents. The model examined the role of parents' alcohol diagnoses, depression and antisocial behavior in a cascading process of risk via 3 major hypothesized pathways: first, via parental warmth/sensitivity from toddler to kindergarten age predicting higher parental monitoring in middle childhood through early adolescence, serving as a protective pathway for adolescent substance use; second, via child low self-regulation in the preschool years to a continuing externalizing behavior problem pathway leading to underage drinking and higher engagement with substance using peers; and third, via higher social competence from kindergarten age through middle childhood being protective against engagement with delinquent and substance using peers, and leading to lower adolescent substance use. The sample consisted of 227 intact families recruited from the community at 12 months of child age. Results were supportive for the first 2 pathways to substance use in late adolescence. Among proximal, early adolescent risks, engagement with delinquent peers and parent's acceptance of underage drinking were significant predictors of late adolescent alcohol and marijuana use. The results highlight the important protective roles of maternal warmth/sensitivity in early childhood to kindergarten age, parental monitoring in middle childhood, and of child self-regulation in the preschool period as reducing risk for externalizing behavior problems, underage drinking, and engagement with delinquent peers in early adolescence. Specific implications for the creation of developmentally fine-tuned preventive intervention are discussed.",
author = "{Das Eiden}, Rina and Jared Lessard and Colder, {Craig R.} and Jennifer Livingston and Meghan Casey and Leonard, {Kenneth E.}",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/dev0000199",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "1619--1633",
journal = "Developmental Psychology",
issn = "0012-1649",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "10",

}

Das Eiden, R, Lessard, J, Colder, CR, Livingston, J, Casey, M & Leonard, KE 2016, 'Developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use from infancy to late adolescence', Developmental psychology, vol. 52, no. 10, pp. 1619-1633. https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0000199

Developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use from infancy to late adolescence. / Das Eiden, Rina; Lessard, Jared; Colder, Craig R.; Livingston, Jennifer; Casey, Meghan; Leonard, Kenneth E.

In: Developmental psychology, Vol. 52, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 1619-1633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use from infancy to late adolescence

AU - Das Eiden, Rina

AU - Lessard, Jared

AU - Colder, Craig R.

AU - Livingston, Jennifer

AU - Casey, Meghan

AU - Leonard, Kenneth E.

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - A developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use beginning in infancy was examined in a sample of children with alcoholic and nonalcoholic parents. The model examined the role of parents' alcohol diagnoses, depression and antisocial behavior in a cascading process of risk via 3 major hypothesized pathways: first, via parental warmth/sensitivity from toddler to kindergarten age predicting higher parental monitoring in middle childhood through early adolescence, serving as a protective pathway for adolescent substance use; second, via child low self-regulation in the preschool years to a continuing externalizing behavior problem pathway leading to underage drinking and higher engagement with substance using peers; and third, via higher social competence from kindergarten age through middle childhood being protective against engagement with delinquent and substance using peers, and leading to lower adolescent substance use. The sample consisted of 227 intact families recruited from the community at 12 months of child age. Results were supportive for the first 2 pathways to substance use in late adolescence. Among proximal, early adolescent risks, engagement with delinquent peers and parent's acceptance of underage drinking were significant predictors of late adolescent alcohol and marijuana use. The results highlight the important protective roles of maternal warmth/sensitivity in early childhood to kindergarten age, parental monitoring in middle childhood, and of child self-regulation in the preschool period as reducing risk for externalizing behavior problems, underage drinking, and engagement with delinquent peers in early adolescence. Specific implications for the creation of developmentally fine-tuned preventive intervention are discussed.

AB - A developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use beginning in infancy was examined in a sample of children with alcoholic and nonalcoholic parents. The model examined the role of parents' alcohol diagnoses, depression and antisocial behavior in a cascading process of risk via 3 major hypothesized pathways: first, via parental warmth/sensitivity from toddler to kindergarten age predicting higher parental monitoring in middle childhood through early adolescence, serving as a protective pathway for adolescent substance use; second, via child low self-regulation in the preschool years to a continuing externalizing behavior problem pathway leading to underage drinking and higher engagement with substance using peers; and third, via higher social competence from kindergarten age through middle childhood being protective against engagement with delinquent and substance using peers, and leading to lower adolescent substance use. The sample consisted of 227 intact families recruited from the community at 12 months of child age. Results were supportive for the first 2 pathways to substance use in late adolescence. Among proximal, early adolescent risks, engagement with delinquent peers and parent's acceptance of underage drinking were significant predictors of late adolescent alcohol and marijuana use. The results highlight the important protective roles of maternal warmth/sensitivity in early childhood to kindergarten age, parental monitoring in middle childhood, and of child self-regulation in the preschool period as reducing risk for externalizing behavior problems, underage drinking, and engagement with delinquent peers in early adolescence. Specific implications for the creation of developmentally fine-tuned preventive intervention are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84984699036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84984699036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/dev0000199

DO - 10.1037/dev0000199

M3 - Article

C2 - 27584669

AN - SCOPUS:84984699036

VL - 52

SP - 1619

EP - 1633

JO - Developmental Psychology

JF - Developmental Psychology

SN - 0012-1649

IS - 10

ER -