Developmental change in processing speed: Domain specificity and stability during childhood and adolescence

Robert V. Kail, Carol A. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

As children develop, they process information more rapidly. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether processing speed in the language domain develops at the same rate as global processing speed. A second aim was to determine the stability of processing speed throughout childhood and adolescence. Children (N = 116) were tested on 10 different speeded tasks at 9 and 14 years of age. Developmental change in processing speed was greater on nonlanguage tasks (sampling global processing speed) than on language tasks. Processing speed was faster on language tasks than on nonlanguage tasks at age 9 but not at age 14. There was evidence of modest continuity in processing speed across the 5-year span.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-137
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Cognition and Development
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 23 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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