Developmental intergroup theory: Explaining and reducing children's social stereotyping and prejudice

Rebecca S. Bigler, Lynn S. Liben

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

376 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social stereotyping and prejudice are intriguing phenomena from the standpoint of theory and, in addition, constitute pressing societal problems. Because stereotyping and prejudice emerge in early childhood, developmental research on causal mechanisms is critical for understanding and controlling stereotyping and prejudice. Such work forms the basis of a new theoretical model, developmental intergroup theory (DIT), which addresses the causal ingredients of stereotyping and prejudice. The work suggests that biases may be largely under environmental control and thus might be shaped via educational, social, and legal policies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-166
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Directions in Psychological Science
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Developmental intergroup theory: Explaining and reducing children's social stereotyping and prejudice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this