Developmental trajectories of clinically significant attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms from grade 3 through 12 in a high-risk sample: Predictors and outcomes

Tyler R. Sasser, Carla B. Kalvin, Karen L. Bierman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study supports the notion that clinically significant ADHD symptoms persist into adolescence for some children, but not for others. Children who are more hyperactive or aggressive, or whose parents are inconsistent or ineffective with discipline, are more likely to have clinically significant and stable ADHD symptoms and show more antisocial activities and worse graduation and employment rates in late adolescence. In contrast, children with clinically significant ADHD symptoms who are less hyperactive and aggressive, and who are more socially isolated, tend to show a declining pattern of ADHD symptoms and better functional outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-219
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of abnormal psychology
Volume125
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Parents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

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