Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer

A. Pandey, V. Forte, M. Abdallah, A. Alickaj, S. Mahmud, S. Asad, S. I. McFarlane

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-209
Number of pages23
JournalMinerva endocrinologica
Volume36
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

Fingerprint

Diabetes Mellitus
Neoplasms
Metformin
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Hypoglycemic Agents
Insulin
Hyperinsulinism
Endometrial Neoplasms
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Hyperglycemia
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Stomach Neoplasms
Colon
Breast
Soil
Obesity
Cytokines
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Pandey, A., Forte, V., Abdallah, M., Alickaj, A., Mahmud, S., Asad, S., & McFarlane, S. I. (2011). Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer. Minerva endocrinologica, 36(3), 187-209.
Pandey, A. ; Forte, V. ; Abdallah, M. ; Alickaj, A. ; Mahmud, S. ; Asad, S. ; McFarlane, S. I. / Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer. In: Minerva endocrinologica. 2011 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 187-209.
@article{d13522b6ff4543c0b49010406bf69f3a,
title = "Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer",
abstract = "Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.",
author = "A. Pandey and V. Forte and M. Abdallah and A. Alickaj and S. Mahmud and S. Asad and McFarlane, {S. I.}",
year = "2011",
month = "9",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "187--209",
journal = "Minerva Endocrinologica",
issn = "0391-1977",
publisher = "Edizioni Minerva Medica S.p.A.",
number = "3",

}

Pandey, A, Forte, V, Abdallah, M, Alickaj, A, Mahmud, S, Asad, S & McFarlane, SI 2011, 'Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer', Minerva endocrinologica, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 187-209.

Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer. / Pandey, A.; Forte, V.; Abdallah, M.; Alickaj, A.; Mahmud, S.; Asad, S.; McFarlane, S. I.

In: Minerva endocrinologica, Vol. 36, No. 3, 01.09.2011, p. 187-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer

AU - Pandey, A.

AU - Forte, V.

AU - Abdallah, M.

AU - Alickaj, A.

AU - Mahmud, S.

AU - Asad, S.

AU - McFarlane, S. I.

PY - 2011/9/1

Y1 - 2011/9/1

N2 - Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.

AB - Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84255168020&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84255168020&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

C2 - 22019750

AN - SCOPUS:84255168020

VL - 36

SP - 187

EP - 209

JO - Minerva Endocrinologica

JF - Minerva Endocrinologica

SN - 0391-1977

IS - 3

ER -

Pandey A, Forte V, Abdallah M, Alickaj A, Mahmud S, Asad S et al. Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer. Minerva endocrinologica. 2011 Sep 1;36(3):187-209.