Dichloroacetate reduces sympathetic nerve responses to static exercise

Steven Ettinger, K. Gray, S. Whisler, Lawrence Sinoway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lactic acid is thought to be a stimulant of muscle metaboreceptors. The goal of the present study was to determine if inhibition of lactic acid production by dichloroacetate (DCA) would attenuate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during static forearm exercise. DCA increases pyruvate dehydrogenase levels. Thus, for a given amount of pyruvate produced, less lactic acid is formed. Seven subjects performed static forearm exercise at 20% maximal voluntary contraction until fatigue followed by posthand-grip circulatory arrest (PHG-CA) (trial 1). Subjects then received DCA (35 mg/kg) and repeated the exercise protocol (trial 2). We observed an attenuated rise in forearm venous lactate and MSNA. The trial 2 MSNA value during PHG-CA was 51 ± 11% less than the value during trial 1 (P < 0.01). In seven control subjects, two bouts of static forearm exercise were performed with an intervening saline infusion. This intervention had no effect on lactate or MSNA responses to exercise. We conclude that DCA attenuates lactate responses to static exercise, and this is associated with a blunted MSNA response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume261
Issue number5 30-5
StatePublished - Dec 1 1991

Fingerprint

Lactic Acid
Forearm
Muscles
Hand Strength
Pyruvic Acid
Clinical Protocols
Fatigue
Oxidoreductases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

@article{df530e78c80c4b24a994653a4621b0b5,
title = "Dichloroacetate reduces sympathetic nerve responses to static exercise",
abstract = "Lactic acid is thought to be a stimulant of muscle metaboreceptors. The goal of the present study was to determine if inhibition of lactic acid production by dichloroacetate (DCA) would attenuate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during static forearm exercise. DCA increases pyruvate dehydrogenase levels. Thus, for a given amount of pyruvate produced, less lactic acid is formed. Seven subjects performed static forearm exercise at 20{\%} maximal voluntary contraction until fatigue followed by posthand-grip circulatory arrest (PHG-CA) (trial 1). Subjects then received DCA (35 mg/kg) and repeated the exercise protocol (trial 2). We observed an attenuated rise in forearm venous lactate and MSNA. The trial 2 MSNA value during PHG-CA was 51 ± 11{\%} less than the value during trial 1 (P < 0.01). In seven control subjects, two bouts of static forearm exercise were performed with an intervening saline infusion. This intervention had no effect on lactate or MSNA responses to exercise. We conclude that DCA attenuates lactate responses to static exercise, and this is associated with a blunted MSNA response.",
author = "Steven Ettinger and K. Gray and S. Whisler and Lawrence Sinoway",
year = "1991",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "261",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0363-6135",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "5 30-5",

}

Dichloroacetate reduces sympathetic nerve responses to static exercise. / Ettinger, Steven; Gray, K.; Whisler, S.; Sinoway, Lawrence.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 261, No. 5 30-5, 01.12.1991.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dichloroacetate reduces sympathetic nerve responses to static exercise

AU - Ettinger, Steven

AU - Gray, K.

AU - Whisler, S.

AU - Sinoway, Lawrence

PY - 1991/12/1

Y1 - 1991/12/1

N2 - Lactic acid is thought to be a stimulant of muscle metaboreceptors. The goal of the present study was to determine if inhibition of lactic acid production by dichloroacetate (DCA) would attenuate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during static forearm exercise. DCA increases pyruvate dehydrogenase levels. Thus, for a given amount of pyruvate produced, less lactic acid is formed. Seven subjects performed static forearm exercise at 20% maximal voluntary contraction until fatigue followed by posthand-grip circulatory arrest (PHG-CA) (trial 1). Subjects then received DCA (35 mg/kg) and repeated the exercise protocol (trial 2). We observed an attenuated rise in forearm venous lactate and MSNA. The trial 2 MSNA value during PHG-CA was 51 ± 11% less than the value during trial 1 (P < 0.01). In seven control subjects, two bouts of static forearm exercise were performed with an intervening saline infusion. This intervention had no effect on lactate or MSNA responses to exercise. We conclude that DCA attenuates lactate responses to static exercise, and this is associated with a blunted MSNA response.

AB - Lactic acid is thought to be a stimulant of muscle metaboreceptors. The goal of the present study was to determine if inhibition of lactic acid production by dichloroacetate (DCA) would attenuate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during static forearm exercise. DCA increases pyruvate dehydrogenase levels. Thus, for a given amount of pyruvate produced, less lactic acid is formed. Seven subjects performed static forearm exercise at 20% maximal voluntary contraction until fatigue followed by posthand-grip circulatory arrest (PHG-CA) (trial 1). Subjects then received DCA (35 mg/kg) and repeated the exercise protocol (trial 2). We observed an attenuated rise in forearm venous lactate and MSNA. The trial 2 MSNA value during PHG-CA was 51 ± 11% less than the value during trial 1 (P < 0.01). In seven control subjects, two bouts of static forearm exercise were performed with an intervening saline infusion. This intervention had no effect on lactate or MSNA responses to exercise. We conclude that DCA attenuates lactate responses to static exercise, and this is associated with a blunted MSNA response.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026350893&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026350893&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 261

JO - American Journal of Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology

SN - 0363-6135

IS - 5 30-5

ER -