Dietary quality, as measured by the Alternative Healthy Eating Index for Pregnancy (AHEI-P), in couples planning their first pregnancy

Pao Ying Hsiao, June L. Fung, Diane C. Mitchell, Terryl J. Hartman, Marlene B. Goldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dietary quality (DQ), as assessed by the Alternative Healthy Eating Index for Pregnancy (AHEI-P), and conception and pregnancy outcomes were evaluated.Design: In this prospective cohort study on couples planning their first pregnancy. Cox proportional hazards regression assessed the relationship between AHEI-P score and clinical pregnancy, live birth and pregnancy loss.Setting: Participants were recruited from the Northeast region of the USA. Participants: Healthy, nulliparous couples (females, n 132; males, n 131; one male did not enrol).Results: There were eighty clinical pregnancies, of which sixty-nine resulted in live births and eleven were pregnancy losses. Mean (sd) female AHEI-P was 71·0 (13·7). Of those who achieved pregnancy, those in the highest tertile of AHEI-P had the greatest proportion of clinical pregnancies; however, this association was not statistically significant (P = 0·41). When the time it took to conceive was considered, females with the highest AHEI-P scores were 20 % and 14 % more likely to achieve clinical pregnancy (model 1: hazard ratio (HR) = 1·20; 95 % CI 0·66, 2·17) and live birth (model 1: HR = 1·14; 95 % CI 0·59, 2·20), respectively. Likelihood of achieving clinical pregnancy and live birth increased when the fully adjusted model, including male AHEI-P score, was examined (clinical pregnancy model 4: HR = 1·55; 95 % CI 0·71, 3·39; live birth model 4: HR = 1·36; 95 % CI 0·59, 3·13).Conclusions: The present study is the first to examine AHEI-P score and achievement of clinical pregnancy. DQ was not significantly related to pregnancy outcomes, even after adjustments for covariates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3385-3394
Number of pages10
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume22
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

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Pregnancy
Live Birth
Proportional Hazards Models
Healthy Diet
Pregnancy Outcome
Healthy Volunteers
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Hsiao, Pao Ying ; Fung, June L. ; Mitchell, Diane C. ; Hartman, Terryl J. ; Goldman, Marlene B. / Dietary quality, as measured by the Alternative Healthy Eating Index for Pregnancy (AHEI-P), in couples planning their first pregnancy. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2019 ; Vol. 22, No. 18. pp. 3385-3394.
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abstract = "Dietary quality (DQ), as assessed by the Alternative Healthy Eating Index for Pregnancy (AHEI-P), and conception and pregnancy outcomes were evaluated.Design: In this prospective cohort study on couples planning their first pregnancy. Cox proportional hazards regression assessed the relationship between AHEI-P score and clinical pregnancy, live birth and pregnancy loss.Setting: Participants were recruited from the Northeast region of the USA. Participants: Healthy, nulliparous couples (females, n 132; males, n 131; one male did not enrol).Results: There were eighty clinical pregnancies, of which sixty-nine resulted in live births and eleven were pregnancy losses. Mean (sd) female AHEI-P was 71·0 (13·7). Of those who achieved pregnancy, those in the highest tertile of AHEI-P had the greatest proportion of clinical pregnancies; however, this association was not statistically significant (P = 0·41). When the time it took to conceive was considered, females with the highest AHEI-P scores were 20 {\%} and 14 {\%} more likely to achieve clinical pregnancy (model 1: hazard ratio (HR) = 1·20; 95 {\%} CI 0·66, 2·17) and live birth (model 1: HR = 1·14; 95 {\%} CI 0·59, 2·20), respectively. Likelihood of achieving clinical pregnancy and live birth increased when the fully adjusted model, including male AHEI-P score, was examined (clinical pregnancy model 4: HR = 1·55; 95 {\%} CI 0·71, 3·39; live birth model 4: HR = 1·36; 95 {\%} CI 0·59, 3·13).Conclusions: The present study is the first to examine AHEI-P score and achievement of clinical pregnancy. DQ was not significantly related to pregnancy outcomes, even after adjustments for covariates.",
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Dietary quality, as measured by the Alternative Healthy Eating Index for Pregnancy (AHEI-P), in couples planning their first pregnancy. / Hsiao, Pao Ying; Fung, June L.; Mitchell, Diane C.; Hartman, Terryl J.; Goldman, Marlene B.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 22, No. 18, 01.12.2019, p. 3385-3394.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Dietary quality, as measured by the Alternative Healthy Eating Index for Pregnancy (AHEI-P), in couples planning their first pregnancy

AU - Hsiao, Pao Ying

AU - Fung, June L.

AU - Mitchell, Diane C.

AU - Hartman, Terryl J.

AU - Goldman, Marlene B.

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Dietary quality (DQ), as assessed by the Alternative Healthy Eating Index for Pregnancy (AHEI-P), and conception and pregnancy outcomes were evaluated.Design: In this prospective cohort study on couples planning their first pregnancy. Cox proportional hazards regression assessed the relationship between AHEI-P score and clinical pregnancy, live birth and pregnancy loss.Setting: Participants were recruited from the Northeast region of the USA. Participants: Healthy, nulliparous couples (females, n 132; males, n 131; one male did not enrol).Results: There were eighty clinical pregnancies, of which sixty-nine resulted in live births and eleven were pregnancy losses. Mean (sd) female AHEI-P was 71·0 (13·7). Of those who achieved pregnancy, those in the highest tertile of AHEI-P had the greatest proportion of clinical pregnancies; however, this association was not statistically significant (P = 0·41). When the time it took to conceive was considered, females with the highest AHEI-P scores were 20 % and 14 % more likely to achieve clinical pregnancy (model 1: hazard ratio (HR) = 1·20; 95 % CI 0·66, 2·17) and live birth (model 1: HR = 1·14; 95 % CI 0·59, 2·20), respectively. Likelihood of achieving clinical pregnancy and live birth increased when the fully adjusted model, including male AHEI-P score, was examined (clinical pregnancy model 4: HR = 1·55; 95 % CI 0·71, 3·39; live birth model 4: HR = 1·36; 95 % CI 0·59, 3·13).Conclusions: The present study is the first to examine AHEI-P score and achievement of clinical pregnancy. DQ was not significantly related to pregnancy outcomes, even after adjustments for covariates.

AB - Dietary quality (DQ), as assessed by the Alternative Healthy Eating Index for Pregnancy (AHEI-P), and conception and pregnancy outcomes were evaluated.Design: In this prospective cohort study on couples planning their first pregnancy. Cox proportional hazards regression assessed the relationship between AHEI-P score and clinical pregnancy, live birth and pregnancy loss.Setting: Participants were recruited from the Northeast region of the USA. Participants: Healthy, nulliparous couples (females, n 132; males, n 131; one male did not enrol).Results: There were eighty clinical pregnancies, of which sixty-nine resulted in live births and eleven were pregnancy losses. Mean (sd) female AHEI-P was 71·0 (13·7). Of those who achieved pregnancy, those in the highest tertile of AHEI-P had the greatest proportion of clinical pregnancies; however, this association was not statistically significant (P = 0·41). When the time it took to conceive was considered, females with the highest AHEI-P scores were 20 % and 14 % more likely to achieve clinical pregnancy (model 1: hazard ratio (HR) = 1·20; 95 % CI 0·66, 2·17) and live birth (model 1: HR = 1·14; 95 % CI 0·59, 2·20), respectively. Likelihood of achieving clinical pregnancy and live birth increased when the fully adjusted model, including male AHEI-P score, was examined (clinical pregnancy model 4: HR = 1·55; 95 % CI 0·71, 3·39; live birth model 4: HR = 1·36; 95 % CI 0·59, 3·13).Conclusions: The present study is the first to examine AHEI-P score and achievement of clinical pregnancy. DQ was not significantly related to pregnancy outcomes, even after adjustments for covariates.

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