Differences in students' smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among public, factory, and private secondary schools in Guangzhou, China: Research article

Xiaozhong Wen, Weiqing Chen, Zhengmin Qian, Joshua E. Muscat, Ciyong Lu, Wenhua Ling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevalence of smoking among Chinese adolescents has dramatically increased in recent years. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Chinese students in 3 types of secondary schools. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 3957 students of seventh, eighth, and ninth grades and 2870 student parents from 3 public, 1 factory, and 2 general-paid private secondary schools at Guangzhou in 2004. Participants were asked to complete self-administered questionnaires about sociodemographic characteristics, smoking-related family and school environments, smoking-related knowledge and attitudes, and smoking behaviors. The average scores of students' smoking-related knowledge and attitudes (higher score, more against smoking) were highest in the factory school, followed by public schools and private schools. The differences among them were statistically significantly (P <.05). The lifetime smoking prevalence was also significantly different (P <.001) among 3 types of schools: 35.4% in private schools, 17.4% in public schools, and 13.2% in the factory school. The prevalence of students' weekly smoking was also higher in private schools (6.2%) than in public schools (4.9%) or the factory school (4.0%). Similar disparity was observed in the prevalence of daily smoking (3.9% private, 3.5% public, and 2.7% factory). However, differences in weekly and daily smoking were not statistically significant (P >.05). Compared with students in public and factory schools, those in general-paid private schools had poorer smoking-related knowledge, more supportive attitudes toward smoking, and more popular smoking behaviors. Therefore, more intensive smoking prevention programs should be implemented among them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-53
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of School Health
Volume78
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

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private school
factory
smoking
China
secondary school
Smoking
Students
Research
student
school
Secondary School
Factory
Research Articles
cross-sectional study
parents
Cross-Sectional Studies
school grade
Parents
adolescent

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Philosophy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Differences in students' smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among public, factory, and private secondary schools in Guangzhou, China: Research article",
abstract = "The prevalence of smoking among Chinese adolescents has dramatically increased in recent years. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Chinese students in 3 types of secondary schools. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 3957 students of seventh, eighth, and ninth grades and 2870 student parents from 3 public, 1 factory, and 2 general-paid private secondary schools at Guangzhou in 2004. Participants were asked to complete self-administered questionnaires about sociodemographic characteristics, smoking-related family and school environments, smoking-related knowledge and attitudes, and smoking behaviors. The average scores of students' smoking-related knowledge and attitudes (higher score, more against smoking) were highest in the factory school, followed by public schools and private schools. The differences among them were statistically significantly (P <.05). The lifetime smoking prevalence was also significantly different (P <.001) among 3 types of schools: 35.4{\%} in private schools, 17.4{\%} in public schools, and 13.2{\%} in the factory school. The prevalence of students' weekly smoking was also higher in private schools (6.2{\%}) than in public schools (4.9{\%}) or the factory school (4.0{\%}). Similar disparity was observed in the prevalence of daily smoking (3.9{\%} private, 3.5{\%} public, and 2.7{\%} factory). However, differences in weekly and daily smoking were not statistically significant (P >.05). Compared with students in public and factory schools, those in general-paid private schools had poorer smoking-related knowledge, more supportive attitudes toward smoking, and more popular smoking behaviors. Therefore, more intensive smoking prevention programs should be implemented among them.",
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Differences in students' smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among public, factory, and private secondary schools in Guangzhou, China : Research article. / Wen, Xiaozhong; Chen, Weiqing; Qian, Zhengmin; Muscat, Joshua E.; Lu, Ciyong; Ling, Wenhua.

In: Journal of School Health, Vol. 78, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 46-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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