Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction

Zhuqing Wang, Alexandru D. Stoica, Dong Ma, Allison Michelle Beese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this work, diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 have been determined by means of in situ loading at room and elevated temperatures using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Theoretical models proposed by Voigt, Reuss, and Kroner were used to determine single-crystal elastic constants from measured diffraction elastic constants, with the Kroner model having the best ability to capture experimental data. The magnitude of single-crystal elastic moduli, computed from single-crystal elastic constants, decreases and the single crystal anisotropy increases as temperature increases, indicating the importance of texture in affecting macroscopic stress at elevated temperatures. The experimental data reported here are of great importance in understanding additive manufacturing of metallic components as: diffraction elastic constants are required for computing residual stresses from residual lattice strains measured using neutron diffraction, which can be used to validate thermomechanical models of additive manufacturing, while single-crystal elastic constants can be used in crystal plasticity modeling, for example, to understand mechanical deformation behavior of additively manufactured components.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)406-412
Number of pages7
JournalMaterials Science and Engineering A
Volume674
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 30 2016

Fingerprint

Inconel (trademark)
Elastic constants
Neutron diffraction
neutron diffraction
elastic properties
Diffraction
Single crystals
single crystals
room temperature
3D printers
diffraction
Temperature
temperature
manufacturing
plastic properties
residual stress
Plasticity
Residual stresses
modulus of elasticity
Anisotropy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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title = "Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction",
abstract = "In this work, diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 have been determined by means of in situ loading at room and elevated temperatures using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Theoretical models proposed by Voigt, Reuss, and Kroner were used to determine single-crystal elastic constants from measured diffraction elastic constants, with the Kroner model having the best ability to capture experimental data. The magnitude of single-crystal elastic moduli, computed from single-crystal elastic constants, decreases and the single crystal anisotropy increases as temperature increases, indicating the importance of texture in affecting macroscopic stress at elevated temperatures. The experimental data reported here are of great importance in understanding additive manufacturing of metallic components as: diffraction elastic constants are required for computing residual stresses from residual lattice strains measured using neutron diffraction, which can be used to validate thermomechanical models of additive manufacturing, while single-crystal elastic constants can be used in crystal plasticity modeling, for example, to understand mechanical deformation behavior of additively manufactured components.",
author = "Zhuqing Wang and Stoica, {Alexandru D.} and Dong Ma and Beese, {Allison Michelle}",
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Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction. / Wang, Zhuqing; Stoica, Alexandru D.; Ma, Dong; Beese, Allison Michelle.

In: Materials Science and Engineering A, Vol. 674, 30.09.2016, p. 406-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction

AU - Wang, Zhuqing

AU - Stoica, Alexandru D.

AU - Ma, Dong

AU - Beese, Allison Michelle

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Y1 - 2016/9/30

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AB - In this work, diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 have been determined by means of in situ loading at room and elevated temperatures using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Theoretical models proposed by Voigt, Reuss, and Kroner were used to determine single-crystal elastic constants from measured diffraction elastic constants, with the Kroner model having the best ability to capture experimental data. The magnitude of single-crystal elastic moduli, computed from single-crystal elastic constants, decreases and the single crystal anisotropy increases as temperature increases, indicating the importance of texture in affecting macroscopic stress at elevated temperatures. The experimental data reported here are of great importance in understanding additive manufacturing of metallic components as: diffraction elastic constants are required for computing residual stresses from residual lattice strains measured using neutron diffraction, which can be used to validate thermomechanical models of additive manufacturing, while single-crystal elastic constants can be used in crystal plasticity modeling, for example, to understand mechanical deformation behavior of additively manufactured components.

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