Digital representation of physical artifacts: The effect of low cost, high accuracy 3D scanning technologies on engineering education, student learning and design evaluation

Nitish Vasudevan, Conrad S. Tucker

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper aims to address two fundamental challenges in engineering education; i) the disconnect between digital and tactile learning activities in traditional Engineering Design curricula and ii) variations in standards used to assess digital activities completed by students. Digital 3D scanning technologies have the potential to mitigate the disconnect between digital and tactile learning activities by providing students with a real time understanding of the relationship between the digital and tactile design space in a real time, dynamic manner. In the process, students are introduced to the concept of reverse engineering as a means of understanding product assembly/disassembly as tactile activities, which can be then seamlessly represented/augmented in the digital space. The researchers of this work aim to understand the impact on the learning outcomes experienced by students when digital and tactile engineering activities are integrated in a real time dynamic manner. To mitigate variations in standards used to assess digital activities completed by students, the authors propose employing a 3D similarity metric that quantifies the differences between digital solutions created by students and a baseline solution from which student solutions are compared against. By establishing a quantitative similarity metric to assess student solutions, variations in grading across different instructors can be minimized and scores finalized in a more timely and efficient manner. The case study presented in this work is based on an Introduction to Engineering Design course, where freshmen students working both in individual and team based design projects are introduced to both digital and tactile activities. The research findings reveal students' perception of 3D scanning technologies as it relates to their experiences with digital and tactile learning activities. After being introduced to digital and tactile activities, students' performance are quantified through controlled design activities that are then assessed/graded using the proposed digital similarity metric.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication15th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 10th International Conference on Design Education; 7th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers
ISBN (Print)9780791855843
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
EventASME 2013 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2013 - Portland, OR, United States
Duration: Aug 4 2013Aug 7 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Volume1

Other

OtherASME 2013 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2013
CountryUnited States
CityPortland, OR
Period8/4/138/7/13

Fingerprint

Engineering Education
Student Learning
Engineering education
Scanning
High Accuracy
Students
Evaluation
Costs
Engineering Design
Metric
Design
Reverse engineering
Disassembly
Reverse Engineering
Curricula
Grading

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

Cite this

Vasudevan, N., & Tucker, C. S. (2013). Digital representation of physical artifacts: The effect of low cost, high accuracy 3D scanning technologies on engineering education, student learning and design evaluation. In 15th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 10th International Conference on Design Education; 7th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems [V001T04A013] (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 1). American Society of Mechanical Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2013-12651
Vasudevan, Nitish ; Tucker, Conrad S. / Digital representation of physical artifacts : The effect of low cost, high accuracy 3D scanning technologies on engineering education, student learning and design evaluation. 15th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 10th International Conference on Design Education; 7th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2013. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference).
@inproceedings{9cccdf3079c04dada0298e483d4ac697,
title = "Digital representation of physical artifacts: The effect of low cost, high accuracy 3D scanning technologies on engineering education, student learning and design evaluation",
abstract = "This paper aims to address two fundamental challenges in engineering education; i) the disconnect between digital and tactile learning activities in traditional Engineering Design curricula and ii) variations in standards used to assess digital activities completed by students. Digital 3D scanning technologies have the potential to mitigate the disconnect between digital and tactile learning activities by providing students with a real time understanding of the relationship between the digital and tactile design space in a real time, dynamic manner. In the process, students are introduced to the concept of reverse engineering as a means of understanding product assembly/disassembly as tactile activities, which can be then seamlessly represented/augmented in the digital space. The researchers of this work aim to understand the impact on the learning outcomes experienced by students when digital and tactile engineering activities are integrated in a real time dynamic manner. To mitigate variations in standards used to assess digital activities completed by students, the authors propose employing a 3D similarity metric that quantifies the differences between digital solutions created by students and a baseline solution from which student solutions are compared against. By establishing a quantitative similarity metric to assess student solutions, variations in grading across different instructors can be minimized and scores finalized in a more timely and efficient manner. The case study presented in this work is based on an Introduction to Engineering Design course, where freshmen students working both in individual and team based design projects are introduced to both digital and tactile activities. The research findings reveal students' perception of 3D scanning technologies as it relates to their experiences with digital and tactile learning activities. After being introduced to digital and tactile activities, students' performance are quantified through controlled design activities that are then assessed/graded using the proposed digital similarity metric.",
author = "Nitish Vasudevan and Tucker, {Conrad S.}",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1115/DETC2013-12651",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780791855843",
series = "Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference",
publisher = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers",
booktitle = "15th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 10th International Conference on Design Education; 7th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems",

}

Vasudevan, N & Tucker, CS 2013, Digital representation of physical artifacts: The effect of low cost, high accuracy 3D scanning technologies on engineering education, student learning and design evaluation. in 15th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 10th International Conference on Design Education; 7th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems., V001T04A013, Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, vol. 1, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, ASME 2013 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2013, Portland, OR, United States, 8/4/13. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2013-12651

Digital representation of physical artifacts : The effect of low cost, high accuracy 3D scanning technologies on engineering education, student learning and design evaluation. / Vasudevan, Nitish; Tucker, Conrad S.

15th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 10th International Conference on Design Education; 7th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2013. V001T04A013 (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 1).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Digital representation of physical artifacts

T2 - The effect of low cost, high accuracy 3D scanning technologies on engineering education, student learning and design evaluation

AU - Vasudevan, Nitish

AU - Tucker, Conrad S.

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - This paper aims to address two fundamental challenges in engineering education; i) the disconnect between digital and tactile learning activities in traditional Engineering Design curricula and ii) variations in standards used to assess digital activities completed by students. Digital 3D scanning technologies have the potential to mitigate the disconnect between digital and tactile learning activities by providing students with a real time understanding of the relationship between the digital and tactile design space in a real time, dynamic manner. In the process, students are introduced to the concept of reverse engineering as a means of understanding product assembly/disassembly as tactile activities, which can be then seamlessly represented/augmented in the digital space. The researchers of this work aim to understand the impact on the learning outcomes experienced by students when digital and tactile engineering activities are integrated in a real time dynamic manner. To mitigate variations in standards used to assess digital activities completed by students, the authors propose employing a 3D similarity metric that quantifies the differences between digital solutions created by students and a baseline solution from which student solutions are compared against. By establishing a quantitative similarity metric to assess student solutions, variations in grading across different instructors can be minimized and scores finalized in a more timely and efficient manner. The case study presented in this work is based on an Introduction to Engineering Design course, where freshmen students working both in individual and team based design projects are introduced to both digital and tactile activities. The research findings reveal students' perception of 3D scanning technologies as it relates to their experiences with digital and tactile learning activities. After being introduced to digital and tactile activities, students' performance are quantified through controlled design activities that are then assessed/graded using the proposed digital similarity metric.

AB - This paper aims to address two fundamental challenges in engineering education; i) the disconnect between digital and tactile learning activities in traditional Engineering Design curricula and ii) variations in standards used to assess digital activities completed by students. Digital 3D scanning technologies have the potential to mitigate the disconnect between digital and tactile learning activities by providing students with a real time understanding of the relationship between the digital and tactile design space in a real time, dynamic manner. In the process, students are introduced to the concept of reverse engineering as a means of understanding product assembly/disassembly as tactile activities, which can be then seamlessly represented/augmented in the digital space. The researchers of this work aim to understand the impact on the learning outcomes experienced by students when digital and tactile engineering activities are integrated in a real time dynamic manner. To mitigate variations in standards used to assess digital activities completed by students, the authors propose employing a 3D similarity metric that quantifies the differences between digital solutions created by students and a baseline solution from which student solutions are compared against. By establishing a quantitative similarity metric to assess student solutions, variations in grading across different instructors can be minimized and scores finalized in a more timely and efficient manner. The case study presented in this work is based on an Introduction to Engineering Design course, where freshmen students working both in individual and team based design projects are introduced to both digital and tactile activities. The research findings reveal students' perception of 3D scanning technologies as it relates to their experiences with digital and tactile learning activities. After being introduced to digital and tactile activities, students' performance are quantified through controlled design activities that are then assessed/graded using the proposed digital similarity metric.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84896951721&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84896951721&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1115/DETC2013-12651

DO - 10.1115/DETC2013-12651

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84896951721

SN - 9780791855843

T3 - Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference

BT - 15th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 10th International Conference on Design Education; 7th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems

PB - American Society of Mechanical Engineers

ER -

Vasudevan N, Tucker CS. Digital representation of physical artifacts: The effect of low cost, high accuracy 3D scanning technologies on engineering education, student learning and design evaluation. In 15th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 10th International Conference on Design Education; 7th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems. American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 2013. V001T04A013. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2013-12651