Digitization of the battlefield using unattended ground sensors

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research in unattended ground sensor (UGS) systems has established the basis for significant advances in determining the local conditions in a tactical battlefield environment. In particular, new technology allows the creation of `throw-away' sensors which can be placed in a battlefield environment and are capable of self-location (via low cost global positioning satellite system technology), self-calibration using a portfolio of sensors to monitor the local environment, and inter-sensor site communications, e.g. via low level commercially available ethernet spread spectrum transceivers and peer-to-peer networking. At the Penn State University Applied Research Laboratory, such a capability has been developed and demonstrated at the breadboard level. Each node of a multi-node system involves a suite of sensors for acoustic/seismic target identification, sound propagation monitoring (depends greatly on weather conditions), barometric pressure, relative humidity, air temperature vertical gradient, wind, soil temperature, moisture, salinity, dielectric constant, and resistance. A small network of UGS nodes can be distributed widely in an array for non-line-of-sight target identification and tracking as well as real time characterization of the battlefield environment. This paper briefly describes the UGS implementation and unclassified experimental results showing a significant impact of the changing environment of acoustic detection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsRaja Suresh, William Langford
Pages165-170
Number of pages6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
EventDigitization of the Battlefield - Orlando, FL, USA
Duration: Apr 10 1996Apr 11 1996

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume2764

Other

OtherDigitization of the Battlefield
CityOrlando, FL, USA
Period4/10/964/11/96

Fingerprint

Analog to digital conversion
Sensors
Acoustics
Research laboratories
Ethernet
Transceivers
Sensor nodes
Atmospheric humidity
Permittivity
Moisture
Acoustic waves
Satellites
Calibration
Soils
Temperature
Monitoring
Communication
Air
Costs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Swanson, D. C. (1996). Digitization of the battlefield using unattended ground sensors. In R. Suresh, & W. Langford (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (pp. 165-170). (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 2764).
Swanson, David Carl. / Digitization of the battlefield using unattended ground sensors. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / Raja Suresh ; William Langford. 1996. pp. 165-170 (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering).
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Swanson, DC 1996, Digitization of the battlefield using unattended ground sensors. in R Suresh & W Langford (eds), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 2764, pp. 165-170, Digitization of the Battlefield, Orlando, FL, USA, 4/10/96.

Digitization of the battlefield using unattended ground sensors. / Swanson, David Carl.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / Raja Suresh; William Langford. 1996. p. 165-170 (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 2764).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Swanson DC. Digitization of the battlefield using unattended ground sensors. In Suresh R, Langford W, editors, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. 1996. p. 165-170. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering).