Discovery of 424 millisecond pulsations from the radio-quiet neutron star in the supernova remnant PKS 1209-51/52

V. E. Zavlin, George Pavlov, D. Sanwal, J. Trümper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The central source of the supernova remnant PKS 1209-51/52 was observed with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer aboard Chandra X-Ray Observatory on 2000 January 6-7. The use of the continuous clocking mode allowed us to perform the timing analysis of the data with a time resolution of 2.85 ms and to find a period P = 0.42412924 s ± 0.23 μs. The detection of this short period proves that the source is a neutron star. It may be either an active pulsar with an unfavorably directed radio beam or a truly radio-silent neutron star whose X-ray pulsations are caused by a nonuniform distribution of surface temperature. To infer the actual properties of this neutron star, the period derivative should be measured.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume540
Issue number1 PART 2
StatePublished - Sep 1 2000

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supernova remnants
neutron stars
radio
radio stars
surface temperature
spectrometer
observatory
imaging spectrometers
pulsars
charge coupled devices
observatories
x rays
time measurement
detection
distribution
analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

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abstract = "The central source of the supernova remnant PKS 1209-51/52 was observed with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer aboard Chandra X-Ray Observatory on 2000 January 6-7. The use of the continuous clocking mode allowed us to perform the timing analysis of the data with a time resolution of 2.85 ms and to find a period P = 0.42412924 s ± 0.23 μs. The detection of this short period proves that the source is a neutron star. It may be either an active pulsar with an unfavorably directed radio beam or a truly radio-silent neutron star whose X-ray pulsations are caused by a nonuniform distribution of surface temperature. To infer the actual properties of this neutron star, the period derivative should be measured.",
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Discovery of 424 millisecond pulsations from the radio-quiet neutron star in the supernova remnant PKS 1209-51/52. / Zavlin, V. E.; Pavlov, George; Sanwal, D.; Trümper, J.

In: Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 540, No. 1 PART 2, 01.09.2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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