Discovery of novel virus sequences in an isolated and threatened bat species, the New Ze aland lesser short-tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata)

Jing Wang, Nicole E. Moore, Zak L. Murray, Kate McInnes, Daniel J. White, Daniel M. Tompkins, Richard J. Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bats harbour a diverse array of viruses, including significant human pathogens. Extensive metagenomic studies of material from bats, in particular guano, have revealed a large number of novel or divergent viral taxa that were previously unknown. New Zealand has only two extant indigenous terrestrial mammals, which are both bats, Mystacina tuberculata (the lesser short- tailed bat) and Chalinolobus tuberculatus (the long-tailed bat). Until the human introduction of exotic mammals, these species had been isolated from all other terrestrial mammals for over 1 million years (potentially over 16 million years for M. tuberculata). Four bat guano samples were collected from M. tuberculata roosts on the isolated offshore island of Whenua hou (Codfish Island) in New Zealand. Metagenomic analysis revealed that this species still hosts a plethora of divergent viruses. Whilst the majority of viruses detected were likely to be of dietary origin, some putative vertebrate virus sequences were identified. Papillomavirus, polyomavirus, calicivirus and hepevirus were found in the metagenomic data and subsequently confirmed using independent PCR assays and sequencing. The new hepevirus and calicivirus sequences may represent new genera within these viral families. Our findings may provide an insight into the origins of viral families, given their detection in an isolated host species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2442-2452
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of General Virology
Volume96
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

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Endangered Species
Viruses
Metagenomics
Hepevirus
Mammals
New Zealand
Islands
Polyomavirus
Vertebrates
Polymerase Chain Reaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Virology

Cite this

Wang, Jing ; Moore, Nicole E. ; Murray, Zak L. ; McInnes, Kate ; White, Daniel J. ; Tompkins, Daniel M. ; Hall, Richard J. / Discovery of novel virus sequences in an isolated and threatened bat species, the New Ze aland lesser short-tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). In: Journal of General Virology. 2015 ; Vol. 96, No. 8. pp. 2442-2452.
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Discovery of novel virus sequences in an isolated and threatened bat species, the New Ze aland lesser short-tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). / Wang, Jing; Moore, Nicole E.; Murray, Zak L.; McInnes, Kate; White, Daniel J.; Tompkins, Daniel M.; Hall, Richard J.

In: Journal of General Virology, Vol. 96, No. 8, 01.08.2015, p. 2442-2452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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