Discussion of “Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition” by Vul et al. (2009)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

In their article, Vul, Harris, Winkielman, and Pashler (2009), (this issue) raise the issue of nonindependent analysis in behavioral neuroimaging, whereby correlations are artificially inflated as a result of spurious statistical procedures. In this comment, I note that the phenomenon in question is a type of selection bias and hence is neither new nor unique to fMRI. The use of massive, complex data sets (common in modern applications) to answer increasingly intricate scientific questions presents many potential pitfalls to valid statistical analysis. Strong collaboration between statisticians and scientists and the development of statistical methods specific to the types of data encountered in practice can help researchers avoid these pitfalls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)308-309
Number of pages2
JournalPerspectives on Psychological Science
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Discussion of “Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition” by Vul et al. (2009)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this