Disrupted effective connectivity between the medial frontal cortex and the caudate in adolescent boys with externalizing behavior disorders

Katherine E. Shannon, Colin Sauder, Theodore P. Beauchaine, Lisa Michelle Kopp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies addressing the neural correlates of criminal behavior have focused primarily on the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala. However, few studies have examined dopaminergic inputs to these or other brain regions, despite the fact that central dopamine (DA) dysfunction is associated with both trait impulsivity and novelty seeking. Given long-standing associations between both of these personality traits and externalizing psychopathology, the authors examined effective connectivity between the caudate nucleus and the anterior cingulate cortex, two areas that rely on DA input to facilitate associative learning and goal directed behavior. Dysfunction in top-down and bottom-up processing within this dopaminergically mediated frontostriatal circuit may be an important biological vulnerability that increases one's likelihood of engaging in delinquent and criminal behavior. When compared with controls, reduced effective connectivity between these regions among adolescents with externalizing psychopathology was found, suggesting deficiencies in frontostriatal circuitry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1141-1157
Number of pages17
JournalCriminal Justice and Behavior
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009

Fingerprint

behavior disorder
criminality
Frontal Lobe
psychopathology
Psychopathology
Mental Disorders
Dopamine
adolescent
Impulsive Behavior
Caudate Nucleus
Gyrus Cinguli
Amygdala
personality traits
Prefrontal Cortex
Personality
brain
vulnerability
Learning
Brain
learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychology(all)
  • Law

Cite this

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Disrupted effective connectivity between the medial frontal cortex and the caudate in adolescent boys with externalizing behavior disorders. / Shannon, Katherine E.; Sauder, Colin; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Kopp, Lisa Michelle.

In: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Vol. 36, No. 11, 01.11.2009, p. 1141-1157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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