Disruption and Reconnection: Counseling Young Adolescents in Japanese Schools

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adolescents face a range of problems in all industrialized nations. In Japan, middle school teachers have a variety of committees and support systems available to assist them in counseling early adolescents. Beginning with two case studies, the author examines the specific systems teachers use. Due to the absence of formal counselors in Japanese schools, teachers are required to provide counseling for a variety of serious mental and emotional problems. Although the system works well on a preventative basis, it can substantially drain a teacher’s time if a child ’s problems are severe. In comparing Japanese and U.S. systems, the author finds that some of the basic organizational elements used by the Japanese have been implemented in California schools. The author argues for a systematic effort at reform rather than trying to adopt certain techniques piecemeal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-184
Number of pages16
JournalEducational Policy
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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counseling
adolescent
teacher
school
counselor
Japan
reform

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Disruption and Reconnection : Counseling Young Adolescents in Japanese Schools. / LeTendre, Gerald.

In: Educational Policy, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.01.1995, p. 169-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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