Disruption of REDD1 gene ameliorates sepsis-induced decrease in mTORC1 signaling but has divergent effects on proteolytic signaling in skeletal muscle

Jennifer L. Steiner, Kristen T. Crowell, Scot R. Kimball, Charles H. Lang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sepsis-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness are due in part to decreased mTORC1-mediated protein synthesis and increased proteolysis via the autophagy-lysosomal system and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The REDD1 (regulated in development and DNA damage-1) protein is increased in sepsis and can negatively regulate mTORC1 activity. However, the contribution of REDD1 to the sepsis-induced change in muscle protein synthesis and degradation has not been determined. Sepsis was produced by cecal ligation and puncture in female REDD1−/− or wild-type (WT) mice, and end points were assessed 24 h later in gastrocnemius; time-matched, pair-fed controls of each genotype were included. Sepsis increased REDD1 protein 300% in WT mice, whereas REDD1 was absent in REDD1−/− muscle. Sepsis decreased protein synthesis and phosphorylation of downstream targets of mTORC1 (S6K1 Thr389, rpS6 Ser240/244, 4E-BP1 Ser65) in WT but not REDD1−/− mice. However, Akt and PRAS40 phosphorylation was suppressed in both sham and septic muscle from REDD1−/− mice despite unaltered PDK1, PP2A, or TSC2 expression. Sepsis increased autophagy as indicated by decreased ULK1 Ser757phosphorylation and p62 abundance and increased LC3B-II/I in WT mice, whereas these changes were absent in septic REDD1−/− mice. Conversely, REDD1 deletion did not prevent the sepsis-induced decrease in IGF-I mRNA or the concomitant increase in IL-6, TNFα, MuRF1, and atrogin1 mRNA expression. Lastly, 5-day survival in a separate set of septic mice did not differ between WT and REDD1−/− mice. These data highlight the central role of REDD1 in regulating both protein synthesis and autophagy in skeletal muscle during sepsis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E981-E994
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume309
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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