Dissolution of albite glass and crystal

James P. Hamilton, Carlo G. Pantano, Susan Louise Brantley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When normalized by initial surface area, crystalline and amorphous albite release Si and Al at the same rate within error (±40%) as measured at pH 2, 5.6, and 8.4 at 25°C. Differences in density and tetrahedral ring structure between the glass and crystal structures, however, lead to more extensive Na and Al depletion from the glass surface, especially in acid. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates that the chemistry of the altered layers on glass and crystal must be significantly different at a depth of ~17Å-87Å. Nevertheless, angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) indicates that the outermost 17Å of the glass and crystal surface are compositionally similar. In neutral and weakly basic conditions, XPS indicates less extensive depletion of Na and Al from reacted glass and crystal surfaces than in acidic conditions. Al enrichment was not observed at any pH on either the crystal or glass surface. At steady state, Al release was stoichiometric for all phases and all pH values, but Na release was always faster than release of Si, especially for the glass. These results are consistent with a model where only the outer surface controls dissolution and the deeper layers of the altered surface do not significantly affect dissolution rate. The similarity in dissolution rate between glass and mineral, if consistent for other phases, may also indicate that some future studies of mineral dissolution could be completed more efficiently by investigation of glass because such studies could reveal the chemical effects in dissolution independent of the microstructure and defects that populate natural mineral samples. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2603-2615
Number of pages13
JournalGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Volume64
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 13 2000

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albite
Dissolution
glass
dissolution
crystal
Glass
Crystals
X-ray spectroscopy
Minerals
X ray photoelectron spectroscopy
mineral
Control surfaces
crystal structure
defect
microstructure
surface area
Crystal structure
Crystalline materials
Defects
Microstructure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Hamilton, James P. ; Pantano, Carlo G. ; Brantley, Susan Louise. / Dissolution of albite glass and crystal. In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta. 2000 ; Vol. 64, No. 15. pp. 2603-2615.
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Dissolution of albite glass and crystal. / Hamilton, James P.; Pantano, Carlo G.; Brantley, Susan Louise.

In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 64, No. 15, 13.09.2000, p. 2603-2615.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Hamilton, James P.

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