Diverse pathways: Race and the incorporation of black, white, and Arab-origin Africans in the United States

Research output: Book/ReportBook

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Africans are among the fastest-growing immigrant groups in the United States. Although they are racially and ethnically diverse, few studies have examined how these differences affect their patterns of incorporation into society. This book is the first to highlight the role of race and ethnicity, Arab ethnicity in particular, in shaping the experiences of African immigrants. It demonstrates that American conceptions of race result in significant inequalities in the ways in which African immigrants are socially integrated. Thomas argues that suggestions that Black Africans are model-minorities who have overcome the barriers of race are misleading, showing that Black and Arab-ethnicity Africans systematically experience less favorable socioeconomic outcomes than their White African counterparts. Overall, the book makes three critical arguments. First, historical and contemporary constructions of race have important implications for understanding the dynamics of African immigration and settlement in the United States. Second, there are significant racial inequalities in the social and economic incorporation of contemporary African immigrants. Finally, Arab ethnicity has additional implications for understanding intra-racial disparities in incorporation among contemporary African immigrants. In general, these arguments are foundational for understanding the diversity of African immigrant experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherMichigan State University Press
Number of pages152
ISBN (Electronic)9781609173951
ISBN (Print)9781611861044
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

    Fingerprint

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this