Diversity and change in the institutional context of immigrant adaptation: California schools 1985-2000.

Jennifer Van Hook, Kelly Stamper Balistreri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article brings attention to a structural dimensions of the schooling context that may affect the incorporation of immigrant youths. Using administrative data about students in California public schools, we found that Spanish-speaking, limited English-proficient (LEP) children have become increasingly more likely to attend schools with low-income, minority, and LEP students than other non-LEP and LEP groups. Nearly all the change in school composition can be attributed to statewide shifts in the composition of the school-aged population. But compositional changes have disproportionately occurred in schools attended by Spanish-speaking LEP students as a result of district-level patterns of segregation by income, race/ethnicity, and language.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-654
Number of pages16
JournalDemography
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography

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