DNA structure and the Werner protein modulate human DNA polymerase delta-dependent replication dynamics within the common fragile site FRA16D

Sandeep N. Shah, Patricia L. Opresko, Xiao Meng, Marietta Y.W.T. Lee, Kristin A. Eckert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Common fragile sites (CFS) are chromosomal regions that exhibit instability during DNA replication stress. Although the mechanism of CFS expression has not been fully elucidated, one known feature is a severely delayed S-phase. We used an in vitro primer extension assay to examine the progression of DNA synthesis through various sequences within FRA16D by the replicative human DNA polymerases δ and α, and with human cell-free extracts. We found that specific cis-acting sequence elements perturb DNA elongation, causing inconsistent DNA synthesis rates between regions on the same strand and complementary strands. Pol δ was significantly inhibited in regions containing hairpins and microsatellites, [AT/TA]24 and [A/T]19-28, compared with a control region with minimal secondary structure. Pol δ processivity was enhanced by full length Werner Syndrome protein (WRN) and by WRN fragments containing either the helicase domain or DNA-binding C-terminal domain. In cell-free extracts, stalling was eliminated at smaller hairpins, but persisted in larger hairpins and microsatellites. Our data support a model whereby CFS expression during cellular stress is due to a combination of factors-density of specific DNA secondary-structures within a genomic region and asymmetric rates of strand synthesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbergkp1131
Pages (from-to)1149-1162
Number of pages14
JournalNucleic acids research
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 5 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics

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