Do All Black Lives Matter Equally to Black People? Respectability Politics and the Limitations of Linked Fate

Tehama Lopez Bunyasi, Candis Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cathy Cohen's (1999) theory of secondary marginalization helps to explain why the needs of some members of Black communities are not prioritized on the Black political agenda; indeed, some groups are ignored altogether as mainstream Black public opinion shifts to the right (Tate 2010). However, the contemporary movement for Black Lives calls for an intersectional approach to Black politics. Its platform requires participants to take seriously the notion that since Black communities are diverse, so are the needs of its members. To what extent are Blacks likely to believe that those who face secondary marginalization should be prioritized on the Black political agenda? What is the role of linked fate in galvanizing support around these marginalized Blacks? To what extent does respectability politics serve to hinder a broader embrace of Blacks who face different sets of interlocking systems of oppression, such as Black women, formerly incarcerated Blacks, undocumented Black people, and Black members of LBGTQ communities in an era marked by Black social movements? We analyze data from the 2016 Collaborative Multi-Racial Post-Election Survey (CMPS) to assess whether all Black lives matter to Black Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-215
Number of pages36
JournalJournal of Race, Ethnicity and Politics
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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political agenda
politics
community
oppression
Social Movements
public opinion
election
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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Anthropology

Cite this

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Do All Black Lives Matter Equally to Black People? Respectability Politics and the Limitations of Linked Fate. / Bunyasi, Tehama Lopez; Smith, Candis.

In: Journal of Race, Ethnicity and Politics, Vol. 4, No. 1, 01.03.2019, p. 180-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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