Do anti-angiogenic or angiogenic factors contribute to the protection of birth weight at high altitude afforded by andean ancestry?

R. Daniela Dávila, Colleen G. Julian, Megan J. Wilson, Vaughn A. Browne, Carmelo Rodriguez, Abigail W. Bigham, Mark D. Shriver, Enrique Vargas, Lorna G. Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This prospective study was designed to determine whether variation in angiogenic (placental growth factor [PlGF]) and/or anti-angiogenic (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase [sFlt-1]) factors contribute to the protective effect of highland ancestry (Andean) from altitude-associated reductions in fetal growth. Study design: Plasma sFlt-1 and PlGF levels, uterine artery (UA) blood flow, and fetal biometry were determined in low-altitude (400 m; Andean n = 27, European n = 28) and high-altitude (3600 m; Andean n = 51, European n = 44) residents during pregnancy (20 and 36 weeks) and 4 months postpartum. Results: High-altitude decreased sFlt-1 levels in both groups, Andeans had lower sFlt-1, comparable PlGF, lower sFlt-1/PlGF ratios, and higher UA blood flow throughout pregnancy relative to Europeans. Altitude decreased birth weight in Europeans but not Andeans. In high-altitude Europeans sFlt-1/PlGF and sFlt-1 levels were negatively associated with UA diameter and birth weight, respectively. Conclusions: Lower sFlt-1 and sFlt-1/PLGF ratio may contribute to or result from variations in maternal vascular adaptation to pregnancy between Andean and Europeans at high altitude. Subsequently, these effects could potentially influence ancestry-associated differences in birth weight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)861-870
Number of pages10
JournalReproductive Sciences
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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    Dávila, R. D., Julian, C. G., Wilson, M. J., Browne, V. A., Rodriguez, C., Bigham, A. W., Shriver, M. D., Vargas, E., & Moore, L. G. (2010). Do anti-angiogenic or angiogenic factors contribute to the protection of birth weight at high altitude afforded by andean ancestry? Reproductive Sciences, 17(9), 861-870. https://doi.org/10.1177/1933719110372418