Do distracting activities increase tolerance for an infant cry?

Kathryn Glodowski, Rachel Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Professionals recommend parents engage in distracting activities to mitigate negative effects of inconsolable infant crying (e.g., Deyo, Skybo, & Carroll, 2008; Goulet et al., 2009). We evaluated the availability of alternative activities on six undergraduates’ tolerance for a recorded infant cry; three students tolerated the cry longer when distracting activities were available. Our results show that distracting activities could decrease the aversiveness of inconsolable infant crying for some individuals; additional research in natural caregiving situations will help determine the generality and social validity of this finding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-164
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Behavior Analysis
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

tolerance
Crying
infant
caregiving
Parents
Students
parents
Research
Tolerance
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Philosophy

Cite this

@article{0a58fc3b50ee44c4967bf991a7613a74,
title = "Do distracting activities increase tolerance for an infant cry?",
abstract = "Professionals recommend parents engage in distracting activities to mitigate negative effects of inconsolable infant crying (e.g., Deyo, Skybo, & Carroll, 2008; Goulet et al., 2009). We evaluated the availability of alternative activities on six undergraduates’ tolerance for a recorded infant cry; three students tolerated the cry longer when distracting activities were available. Our results show that distracting activities could decrease the aversiveness of inconsolable infant crying for some individuals; additional research in natural caregiving situations will help determine the generality and social validity of this finding.",
author = "Kathryn Glodowski and Rachel Thompson",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/jaba.361",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "159--164",
journal = "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis",
issn = "0021-8855",
publisher = "Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior Inc.",
number = "1",

}

Do distracting activities increase tolerance for an infant cry? / Glodowski, Kathryn; Thompson, Rachel.

In: Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Vol. 50, No. 1, 01.12.2017, p. 159-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do distracting activities increase tolerance for an infant cry?

AU - Glodowski, Kathryn

AU - Thompson, Rachel

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Professionals recommend parents engage in distracting activities to mitigate negative effects of inconsolable infant crying (e.g., Deyo, Skybo, & Carroll, 2008; Goulet et al., 2009). We evaluated the availability of alternative activities on six undergraduates’ tolerance for a recorded infant cry; three students tolerated the cry longer when distracting activities were available. Our results show that distracting activities could decrease the aversiveness of inconsolable infant crying for some individuals; additional research in natural caregiving situations will help determine the generality and social validity of this finding.

AB - Professionals recommend parents engage in distracting activities to mitigate negative effects of inconsolable infant crying (e.g., Deyo, Skybo, & Carroll, 2008; Goulet et al., 2009). We evaluated the availability of alternative activities on six undergraduates’ tolerance for a recorded infant cry; three students tolerated the cry longer when distracting activities were available. Our results show that distracting activities could decrease the aversiveness of inconsolable infant crying for some individuals; additional research in natural caregiving situations will help determine the generality and social validity of this finding.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84999750697&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84999750697&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jaba.361

DO - 10.1002/jaba.361

M3 - Article

C2 - 27779313

AN - SCOPUS:84999750697

VL - 50

SP - 159

EP - 164

JO - Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis

JF - Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis

SN - 0021-8855

IS - 1

ER -