Do distracting activities increase tolerance for an infant cry?

Kathryn Glodowski, Rachel Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Professionals recommend parents engage in distracting activities to mitigate negative effects of inconsolable infant crying (e.g., Deyo, Skybo, & Carroll, 2008; Goulet et al., 2009). We evaluated the availability of alternative activities on six undergraduates’ tolerance for a recorded infant cry; three students tolerated the cry longer when distracting activities were available. Our results show that distracting activities could decrease the aversiveness of inconsolable infant crying for some individuals; additional research in natural caregiving situations will help determine the generality and social validity of this finding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-164
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Behavior Analysis
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Philosophy

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