Do Firms Use Tax Reserves to Meet Analysts’ Forecasts? Evidence from the Pre- and Post-FIN 48 Periods

Sanjay Gupta, Rick C. Laux, Daniel P. Lynch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine whether firms decrease tax reserves to meet analysts’ quarterly earnings forecasts in the period prior to FIN 48, and whether that behavior changed following FIN 48. We use analysts’ forecasts of pretax and after-tax income to impute premanaged earnings, or earnings before any tax manipulation. Pre-FIN 48, we observe that firms reduce their tax reserves (i.e., increase income) when premanaged earnings are below analysts’ forecasts. Specifically, 78 percent of firm-quarters that would have missed the analyst forecast if not for the tax reserve decrease, meet that target when the decrease is included. Furthermore, we find a significant positive association between the decrease in tax reserves and the deviation of premanaged earnings from analysts’ forecasts. In contrast, post-FIN 48, we find no evidence that firms use changes in tax reserves to manage earnings to meet analysts’ forecasts. Thus, our results suggest that FIN 48 has, at least initially, curtailed firms’ use of tax reserves to manage earnings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1044-1074
Number of pages31
JournalContemporary Accounting Research
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Tax
Analysts' forecasts
Deviation
Income
Income tax
Analysts' earnings forecasts
Manipulation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Gupta, Sanjay ; Laux, Rick C. ; Lynch, Daniel P. / Do Firms Use Tax Reserves to Meet Analysts’ Forecasts? Evidence from the Pre- and Post-FIN 48 Periods. In: Contemporary Accounting Research. 2016 ; Vol. 33, No. 3. pp. 1044-1074.
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Do Firms Use Tax Reserves to Meet Analysts’ Forecasts? Evidence from the Pre- and Post-FIN 48 Periods. / Gupta, Sanjay; Laux, Rick C.; Lynch, Daniel P.

In: Contemporary Accounting Research, Vol. 33, No. 3, 01.01.2016, p. 1044-1074.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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