Do Maternity Care Coordination Services Encourage Use of Behavioral Health Treatment among Pregnant Women on Medicaid?

Megan Shepherd-Banigan, Marisa E. Domino, Rebecca Wells, Regina Rutledge, Marianne Messersmith Hillemeier, Courtney H. Van Houtven

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective Maternity care coordination (MCC) may provide an opportunity to enhance access to behavioral health treatment services. However, this relationship has not been examined extensively in the empirical literature. This study examines the effect of MCC on use of behavioral health services among perinatal women. Methods Medicaid claims data from October 2008 to September 2010 were analyzed using linear fixed effects models to investigate the effects of receipt of MCC services on mental health and substance use–related service use among Medicaid-eligible pregnant and postpartum women in North Carolina (n = 7,406). Results Receipt of MCC is associated with a 20% relative increase in the contemporaneous use of any mental health treatment (within-person change in probability of any mental health visit 0.5% [95% CI, 0.1%–1.0%], or an increase from 8.3% to 8.8%); MCC in the prior month is associated with a 34% relative increase in the number of mental health visits among women who receive MCC (within-person change in the number of visits received 1.7% [95 CI, 0.2%–3.3%], or from 0.44 to 0.46 mental health visits). No relationship was observed between MCC and Medicaid-funded substance use–related treatment services. Conclusions MCC may be an effective way to quickly address perinatal mental health needs and engage low-income women in mental health care. However, currently there may be a lost opportunity within MCC to increase access to substance use–related treatment. Future studies should examine how MCC improves access to mental health care such that the program's ability can be strengthened to identify women with substance use–related disorders and transition them into available care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-455
Number of pages7
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Medicaid
Pregnant Women
Mental Health
Health
mental health
health
Therapeutics
Health Services
Health Services Accessibility
Aptitude
Mental Health Services
Postpartum Period
health care
human being
Delivery of Health Care
health service
low income

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

Shepherd-Banigan, Megan ; Domino, Marisa E. ; Wells, Rebecca ; Rutledge, Regina ; Hillemeier, Marianne Messersmith ; Van Houtven, Courtney H. / Do Maternity Care Coordination Services Encourage Use of Behavioral Health Treatment among Pregnant Women on Medicaid?. In: Women's Health Issues. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 449-455.
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title = "Do Maternity Care Coordination Services Encourage Use of Behavioral Health Treatment among Pregnant Women on Medicaid?",
abstract = "Objective Maternity care coordination (MCC) may provide an opportunity to enhance access to behavioral health treatment services. However, this relationship has not been examined extensively in the empirical literature. This study examines the effect of MCC on use of behavioral health services among perinatal women. Methods Medicaid claims data from October 2008 to September 2010 were analyzed using linear fixed effects models to investigate the effects of receipt of MCC services on mental health and substance use–related service use among Medicaid-eligible pregnant and postpartum women in North Carolina (n = 7,406). Results Receipt of MCC is associated with a 20{\%} relative increase in the contemporaneous use of any mental health treatment (within-person change in probability of any mental health visit 0.5{\%} [95{\%} CI, 0.1{\%}–1.0{\%}], or an increase from 8.3{\%} to 8.8{\%}); MCC in the prior month is associated with a 34{\%} relative increase in the number of mental health visits among women who receive MCC (within-person change in the number of visits received 1.7{\%} [95 CI, 0.2{\%}–3.3{\%}], or from 0.44 to 0.46 mental health visits). No relationship was observed between MCC and Medicaid-funded substance use–related treatment services. Conclusions MCC may be an effective way to quickly address perinatal mental health needs and engage low-income women in mental health care. However, currently there may be a lost opportunity within MCC to increase access to substance use–related treatment. Future studies should examine how MCC improves access to mental health care such that the program's ability can be strengthened to identify women with substance use–related disorders and transition them into available care.",
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Do Maternity Care Coordination Services Encourage Use of Behavioral Health Treatment among Pregnant Women on Medicaid? / Shepherd-Banigan, Megan; Domino, Marisa E.; Wells, Rebecca; Rutledge, Regina; Hillemeier, Marianne Messersmith; Van Houtven, Courtney H.

In: Women's Health Issues, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.07.2017, p. 449-455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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