Do milk-borne cytokines and hormones influence neonatal immune cell function?

Lorie A. Ellis, Andrea M. Mastro, Mary Frances Picciano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cytokines, growth factors and various hormones collectively control the proliferation, survival, differentiation and function of immune cells. A wide array of these compounds is present in maternal milk and ingested by neonates during a period of rapid maturation of gut-associated and peripheral lymphoid tissues. The functional consequences of most milk immunomodulatory constituents in neonates are unknown. However, there is evidence that milk prolactin acts as a developmental regulator of the neonatal immune system, supporting the premise that milk constituents with immunomodulatory activity may serve as neonatal immunodevelopment aqents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume127
Issue number5 SUPPL.
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Milk
cytokines
hormones
Hormones
Cytokines
milk
neonates
maternal milk
cells
prolactin
growth factors
immune system
Lymphoid Tissue
digestive system
Prolactin
Immune System
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Mothers
tissues

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Ellis, L. A., Mastro, A. M., & Picciano, M. F. (1997). Do milk-borne cytokines and hormones influence neonatal immune cell function? Journal of Nutrition, 127(5 SUPPL.).
Ellis, Lorie A. ; Mastro, Andrea M. ; Picciano, Mary Frances. / Do milk-borne cytokines and hormones influence neonatal immune cell function?. In: Journal of Nutrition. 1997 ; Vol. 127, No. 5 SUPPL.
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Ellis, LA, Mastro, AM & Picciano, MF 1997, 'Do milk-borne cytokines and hormones influence neonatal immune cell function?', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 127, no. 5 SUPPL..

Do milk-borne cytokines and hormones influence neonatal immune cell function? / Ellis, Lorie A.; Mastro, Andrea M.; Picciano, Mary Frances.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 127, No. 5 SUPPL., 1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Ellis, Lorie A.

AU - Mastro, Andrea M.

AU - Picciano, Mary Frances

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