Do perceptions of the neighbourhood food environment predict fruit and vegetable intake in low-income neighbourhoods?

Ellen Flint, Steven Cummins, Stephen Matthews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which perceptions of the quality, variety and affordability of local food retail provision predict fruit and vegetable intake. Secondary analysis of baseline data from the Philadelphia Neighbourhood Food Environment Study was undertaken. This study investigating the role of the neighbourhood food environment on diet and obesity comprised a random sample of households from two low-income Philadelphia neighbourhoods, matched on socio-demographic characteristics and food environment. The analytic sample comprised adult men and women aged 18-92 (. n=1263). Perception of the food environment was measured using five related dimensions pertaining to quality, choice and expense of local food outlets and locally available fruits and vegetables. The outcome, portions of fruits and vegetables consumed per day, was measured using the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire. Results from multivariate regression analyses suggest that measured dimensions of perceived neighbourhood food environment did not predict fruit and vegetable consumption. Further investigation of what constitutes an individual's 'true' food retail environment is required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-15
Number of pages5
JournalHealth and Place
Volume24
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

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vegetables
Vegetables
vegetable
Fruit
low income
fruit
income
food
Food
obesity
secondary analysis
random sample
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity
Regression Analysis
Demography
diet
Diet
regression
questionnaire

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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Do perceptions of the neighbourhood food environment predict fruit and vegetable intake in low-income neighbourhoods? / Flint, Ellen; Cummins, Steven; Matthews, Stephen.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 24, 11.2013, p. 11-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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